Writing Aides

This category includes articles that examined the use of writing tools (e.g., word prediction software and smart pens) to enhance learning and improve student outcomes.

An enhanced concept map approach to improving children’s storytelling ability

Jan 15, 2013, 17:07 PM

Liu, C-C., Chen, H.S.L., Shih, J-L., Huang, G-T. & Liu, B-J. (2011). An enhanced concept map approach to improving children’s storytelling ability. Computers & Education, 56, 873-884.

Characteristics

  • Grade/Age Level: 9- and 10-year-olds
  • Specific Difficulty Addressed: Storytelling with complex structure
  • Type of AT Used: Software in development using multimedia concept mapping and “story grammars”

Setting

Method

  • The concept map storyboard supports students in creating a series of episodes of a story in which each episode is visible on the story flow and the relationship between episodes is explicitly presented.
  • Story grammars are supported to enhance meta-level story knowledge.
  • Participants were 114, 9- and 10-year-olds in Taiwan.
  • Students were introduced to the concept map system and given an hour to test the system. Then they were required to develop a story title “adventure to the moon” using the program for a total of 5 hours.
  • Each student had access to a computer, microphone, keyboard, mouse, speaker, and stylus pad.
  • The experimental group was made up of 57 students who had access to the story grammars (Setting, Consequences, Actions, and Events writing supports).
  • The control group was made up of 57 students who had access only to the concept map storyboard without story grammars.
  • Control and experimental groups were evaluated by 3 teachers through the consensual assessment technique to determine the quality of the creative stories.
  • The Digital Storytelling Evaluation Rubric (Via, 2002) was used by teachers and students to evaluate the stories.

Results

  • Students in the experimental group had a significantly higher number of episodes, vocalization recordings, action episodes, event episodes, and consequence episodes.
  • Teachers rated the stories produced by the experimental group as being higher quality.
  • The student’s self-evaluation of their stories was higher in the experimental group, especially for action dialog.
Categories:
  • Writing Aides
Tags:
  • Evaluation of CAL systems
  • Interactive learning environments
  • Multimedia/hypermedia systems
  • Human-computer interface

Computer Assisted Instruction

An enhanced concept map approach to improving children’s storytelling ability

Jan 15, 2013, 17:07 PM

Liu, C-C., Chen, H.S.L., Shih, J-L., Huang, G-T. & Liu, B-J. (2011). An enhanced concept map approach to improving children’s storytelling ability. Computers & Education, 56, 873-884.

Characteristics

  • Grade/Age Level: 9- and 10-year-olds
  • Specific Difficulty Addressed: Storytelling with complex structure
  • Type of AT Used: Software in development using multimedia concept mapping and “story grammars”

Setting

Method

  • The concept map storyboard supports students in creating a series of episodes of a story in which each episode is visible on the story flow and the relationship between episodes is explicitly presented.
  • Story grammars are supported to enhance meta-level story knowledge.
  • Participants were 114, 9- and 10-year-olds in Taiwan.
  • Students were introduced to the concept map system and given an hour to test the system. Then they were required to develop a story title “adventure to the moon” using the program for a total of 5 hours.
  • Each student had access to a computer, microphone, keyboard, mouse, speaker, and stylus pad.
  • The experimental group was made up of 57 students who had access to the story grammars (Setting, Consequences, Actions, and Events writing supports).
  • The control group was made up of 57 students who had access only to the concept map storyboard without story grammars.
  • Control and experimental groups were evaluated by 3 teachers through the consensual assessment technique to determine the quality of the creative stories.
  • The Digital Storytelling Evaluation Rubric (Via, 2002) was used by teachers and students to evaluate the stories.

Results

  • Students in the experimental group had a significantly higher number of episodes, vocalization recordings, action episodes, event episodes, and consequence episodes.
  • Teachers rated the stories produced by the experimental group as being higher quality.
  • The student’s self-evaluation of their stories was higher in the experimental group, especially for action dialog.
Categories:
  • Writing Aides
Tags:
  • Evaluation of CAL systems
  • Interactive learning environments
  • Multimedia/hypermedia systems
  • Human-computer interface