Writing Aides

This category includes articles that examined the use of writing tools (e.g., word prediction software and smart pens) to enhance learning and improve student outcomes.

Response to intervention and evidence-based practices: Where does technology fit?

Jul 1, 2013, 15:52 PM
Smith, S. J., & Okolo, C. (2010). Response to intervention and evidence-based practices: Where does technology fit? Learning Disability Quarterly, 33(4), 257-272.

Characteristics

  • This article describes the use of technology-based strategies as intervention components used within a response to intervention framework.
  • More specifically, this article describes three evidence-based strategies (i.e., graphic organizers, support for writing, and explicit instruction) and how technology can be used within each approach.

Setting

Method

  • This literature review describes research findings relating to three strategies commonly used within an RTI framework and describes the technologies that can be used with the three evidence-based strategies.

Results

Graphic Organizers
  • Graphic organizers provide students with a way to organize classroom materials and link relevant concepts, and have been found to effectively help students with learning disabilities improve their performance on measures of content knowledge.
  • These tools can be used across the 3 RTI tiers for students with and without disabilities at all grade levels.
  • Computerized graphic organizers are increasingly common in schools and provide students with interactive features that they are unable to access when using traditional paper-based graphic organizers.
  • Examples of computerized graphic organizer software and web-based programs include Inspiration, Kidspiration, and Draft Builder.

Writing instruction

  • Research suggests that students with disabilities may require further systematic instruction in writing in order to be successful writers.
  • In particular, previous findings suggest that students with learning disabilities need to be (1) explicitly taught how to plan, revise, and edit, (2) assigned specific achievable goals for each writing assignment, and (3) taught how to use word processing software to complete writing assignments.
  • Technology can be used to help support students throughout the writing process.
  • Tools such as MS Word and Word Q  provide students with spell check and word prediction tools.
  • Other programs, such as Dragon Naturally Speaking and Write Outloud, allow students’ verbal output to be converted to text.

Explicit Instruction

  • Research suggests that students with disabilities benefit from receiving instruction that emphasizes the big ideas, conspicuous strategies, mediated scaffolding, strategic integration, judicious review, and priming of background knowledge.
  • Several key components of explicit instruction (i.e., practice of basic skills, increased learning time, opportunities for feedback and review, and progress monitoring) can be provided to students using technology-based tools.
  • For example, several websites provide students with additional practice in concepts relating to reading (e.g., Don Johnston), expressive language (e.g., Laureate Learning Systems), and other academic areas (e.g., BrainPop).
  • Other programs, such as Cramberry, provide teachers and students with flashcards and study schedules.
  • The Reading Assistant program listens to students reading aloud and monitors their reading accuracy.
  • In general, technology can be used to help reinforce the concepts all students, and students with disabilities in particular, need to learn in the classroom.
Categories:
  • Writing
Tags:

Computer Assisted Instruction

Response to intervention and evidence-based practices: Where does technology fit?

Jul 1, 2013, 15:52 PM
Smith, S. J., & Okolo, C. (2010). Response to intervention and evidence-based practices: Where does technology fit? Learning Disability Quarterly, 33(4), 257-272.

Characteristics

  • This article describes the use of technology-based strategies as intervention components used within a response to intervention framework.
  • More specifically, this article describes three evidence-based strategies (i.e., graphic organizers, support for writing, and explicit instruction) and how technology can be used within each approach.

Setting

Method

  • This literature review describes research findings relating to three strategies commonly used within an RTI framework and describes the technologies that can be used with the three evidence-based strategies.

Results

Graphic Organizers
  • Graphic organizers provide students with a way to organize classroom materials and link relevant concepts, and have been found to effectively help students with learning disabilities improve their performance on measures of content knowledge.
  • These tools can be used across the 3 RTI tiers for students with and without disabilities at all grade levels.
  • Computerized graphic organizers are increasingly common in schools and provide students with interactive features that they are unable to access when using traditional paper-based graphic organizers.
  • Examples of computerized graphic organizer software and web-based programs include Inspiration, Kidspiration, and Draft Builder.

Writing instruction

  • Research suggests that students with disabilities may require further systematic instruction in writing in order to be successful writers.
  • In particular, previous findings suggest that students with learning disabilities need to be (1) explicitly taught how to plan, revise, and edit, (2) assigned specific achievable goals for each writing assignment, and (3) taught how to use word processing software to complete writing assignments.
  • Technology can be used to help support students throughout the writing process.
  • Tools such as MS Word and Word Q  provide students with spell check and word prediction tools.
  • Other programs, such as Dragon Naturally Speaking and Write Outloud, allow students’ verbal output to be converted to text.

Explicit Instruction

  • Research suggests that students with disabilities benefit from receiving instruction that emphasizes the big ideas, conspicuous strategies, mediated scaffolding, strategic integration, judicious review, and priming of background knowledge.
  • Several key components of explicit instruction (i.e., practice of basic skills, increased learning time, opportunities for feedback and review, and progress monitoring) can be provided to students using technology-based tools.
  • For example, several websites provide students with additional practice in concepts relating to reading (e.g., Don Johnston), expressive language (e.g., Laureate Learning Systems), and other academic areas (e.g., BrainPop).
  • Other programs, such as Cramberry, provide teachers and students with flashcards and study schedules.
  • The Reading Assistant program listens to students reading aloud and monitors their reading accuracy.
  • In general, technology can be used to help reinforce the concepts all students, and students with disabilities in particular, need to learn in the classroom.
Categories:
  • Writing
Tags: