Writing Aides

This category includes articles that examined the use of writing tools (e.g., word prediction software and smart pens) to enhance learning and improve student outcomes.

Writing in a multimedia environment: Pilot outcomes for high school students in special education

Jul 1, 2013, 15:57 PM
Rao, K., Dowrick, P. W., Yuen, J. W. L., & Boisvert, P. C. (2009). Writing in a multimedia environment: Pilot outcomes for high school students in special education. Journal of Special Education Technology, 24(1), 27-38.

Characteristics

  • Twenty-five high school students from Hawaii reading below grade level participated in the treatment condition of the study.
  • Within this study, students were immersed in a “generative multimedia environment” using TeenACE programming in which they used computers to write their stories and integrate pictures and audio with text.
  • The authors sought to investigate the effect of the program on students’ written expression as it relates to their: abilities to convey meaning, their writing clarity, and their use of writing conventions.
  • Students used IntelliTools multimedia authoring software to create their stories.
  • The IntelliTools program contained a text-to-speech function, allowed for the integration of images, and gave students the option of recording narrations for their stories.

Setting

  • The study took place at a rural high school in Hawaii.

Method

  • Students worked through the TeenACE program for 8 weeks at school.
  • Students were divided into teams of 2 to collaborate on all TeenACE writing activities throughout the intervention.
  • Each student was expected to write 5 stories during the intervention, which were later evaluated for the quality of writing displayed in each story.
  • In addition, the teacher was asked to keep a daily log and was interviewed throughout the implementation process.

Results

  • A comparison of students’ first and last stories revealed significant improvement in students’ written expression throughout the course of the intervention.
  • Data gathered via interviews with the teacher suggested that students’ independence with writing increased as did their sense of what constitutes good writing.
  • In addition, data suggested that students typically remained highly engaged in intervention activities.
  • In general, the intervention was successful in increasing struggling students’ exposure to writing-related activities and increasing the quality of their writing.
Categories:
  • Writing
Tags:

Computer Assisted Instruction

Writing in a multimedia environment: Pilot outcomes for high school students in special education

Jul 1, 2013, 15:57 PM
Rao, K., Dowrick, P. W., Yuen, J. W. L., & Boisvert, P. C. (2009). Writing in a multimedia environment: Pilot outcomes for high school students in special education. Journal of Special Education Technology, 24(1), 27-38.

Characteristics

  • Twenty-five high school students from Hawaii reading below grade level participated in the treatment condition of the study.
  • Within this study, students were immersed in a “generative multimedia environment” using TeenACE programming in which they used computers to write their stories and integrate pictures and audio with text.
  • The authors sought to investigate the effect of the program on students’ written expression as it relates to their: abilities to convey meaning, their writing clarity, and their use of writing conventions.
  • Students used IntelliTools multimedia authoring software to create their stories.
  • The IntelliTools program contained a text-to-speech function, allowed for the integration of images, and gave students the option of recording narrations for their stories.

Setting

  • The study took place at a rural high school in Hawaii.

Method

  • Students worked through the TeenACE program for 8 weeks at school.
  • Students were divided into teams of 2 to collaborate on all TeenACE writing activities throughout the intervention.
  • Each student was expected to write 5 stories during the intervention, which were later evaluated for the quality of writing displayed in each story.
  • In addition, the teacher was asked to keep a daily log and was interviewed throughout the implementation process.

Results

  • A comparison of students’ first and last stories revealed significant improvement in students’ written expression throughout the course of the intervention.
  • Data gathered via interviews with the teacher suggested that students’ independence with writing increased as did their sense of what constitutes good writing.
  • In addition, data suggested that students typically remained highly engaged in intervention activities.
  • In general, the intervention was successful in increasing struggling students’ exposure to writing-related activities and increasing the quality of their writing.
Categories:
  • Writing
Tags: