Writing Aides

This category includes articles that examined the use of writing tools (e.g., word prediction software and smart pens) to enhance learning and improve student outcomes.

The effectiveness of information and communication technology on the learning of written English for 5- to 16-year-olds

Jul 1, 2013, 15:17 PM
Andrews, R., Freeman, A., Hou, D., McGuinn, N., Robinson, A., & Zhu, J. (2007). The effectiveness of information and communication technology on the learning of written English for 5- to 16-year-olds. British Journal of Educational Technology, 38(2), 32-336.

Characteristics

  • This study reviewed articles looking at the impact of information and communication technologies (ICTs) on teaching writing composition to students aged 5 to 16.
  • The studies had to: focus on information and communication technologies (ICTs) and written composition, include experimental and control conditions, and quantifiable outcome measures.
  • Nine studies meeting the inclusion criteria were found and investigated for this project as an in-depth review.
  • Eight studies focused on students aged 11-16, 3 studies focused on students aged 5-10, and 2 included both age groups.
  • Four of the studies invested the use of computer-assisted instruction for writing, 3 looked at the effectiveness of word processing tools, and 2 looked at the impact of using multimedia to enhance student writing.

Setting

  • All reviewed studies took place in the U.S.

Method

  • The authors conducted an electronic search for articles matching their inclusion criteria.
  • They conducted a narrative review of the 9 studies matching their inclusion criteria and the weight of evidence presented in each study was determined.

Results

  • One of the studies was judged to have “high to medium” evidence of its: trustworthiness, research design and analysis appropriateness, and relevance to the current review.
  • The remaining 8 studies received an overall weighting of “medium.”
  • Lewis et al. (1999), the study with the “high to medium” weighting, evaluated the effectiveness of using word processing tools and teacher instruction on students editing and revision skills.
  • They evaluated the effectiveness of the Write This Way word processing program, and found that although there was little difference in the writing quality of control and experimental group participants, students that used the spelling and grammar checkers significantly decreased the amount of errors they made on pre- to post-test writing measures.
  • Barrera et al. (2001) investigated 1st grade students’ writing performance when using a computerized word processing program vs. handwriting assignments.
  • Using the computer resulted in more sentences and words written than when assignments were handwritten.
  • Cramer and Smith (2002) evaluated whether students’ writing organization and voice/ideas improved with the implementation of technology-rich instruction.
  • The study yielded no statistically significant differences between students in the experimental and control groups.
  • Fran and Orey (2001) looked at how the use of multimedia technology impacted student writing performance.
  • A comparison of pre- and post-test writing composition revealed that students’ participation in a 6-week treatment that incorporated multimedia into writing instruction did not lead to significant improvements; however, students’ motivation towards engaging in the writing process increased.
  • Lowther et al. (2003) examined the impact of using laptops to enhance student writing.
  • The study found that using laptops for writing significantly improved students’ content, organization, and writing style.
  • In a series of 4 studies, Rowley et al. (1998) evaluated the effectiveness of using the Reading and Writing in a Supportive Environment (R-WISE) software   program to improve the prose composition of students.
  • The studies found small gains in the writing composition of students using the word-processing package.
  • The general findings of this review demonstrate that few studies have specifically investigated the effects of using ICTs to improve student writing; thus, more studies in this area are needed.
Categories:
  • Writing
Tags:

Computer Assisted Instruction

The effectiveness of information and communication technology on the learning of written English for 5- to 16-year-olds

Jul 1, 2013, 15:17 PM
Andrews, R., Freeman, A., Hou, D., McGuinn, N., Robinson, A., & Zhu, J. (2007). The effectiveness of information and communication technology on the learning of written English for 5- to 16-year-olds. British Journal of Educational Technology, 38(2), 32-336.

Characteristics

  • This study reviewed articles looking at the impact of information and communication technologies (ICTs) on teaching writing composition to students aged 5 to 16.
  • The studies had to: focus on information and communication technologies (ICTs) and written composition, include experimental and control conditions, and quantifiable outcome measures.
  • Nine studies meeting the inclusion criteria were found and investigated for this project as an in-depth review.
  • Eight studies focused on students aged 11-16, 3 studies focused on students aged 5-10, and 2 included both age groups.
  • Four of the studies invested the use of computer-assisted instruction for writing, 3 looked at the effectiveness of word processing tools, and 2 looked at the impact of using multimedia to enhance student writing.

Setting

  • All reviewed studies took place in the U.S.

Method

  • The authors conducted an electronic search for articles matching their inclusion criteria.
  • They conducted a narrative review of the 9 studies matching their inclusion criteria and the weight of evidence presented in each study was determined.

Results

  • One of the studies was judged to have “high to medium” evidence of its: trustworthiness, research design and analysis appropriateness, and relevance to the current review.
  • The remaining 8 studies received an overall weighting of “medium.”
  • Lewis et al. (1999), the study with the “high to medium” weighting, evaluated the effectiveness of using word processing tools and teacher instruction on students editing and revision skills.
  • They evaluated the effectiveness of the Write This Way word processing program, and found that although there was little difference in the writing quality of control and experimental group participants, students that used the spelling and grammar checkers significantly decreased the amount of errors they made on pre- to post-test writing measures.
  • Barrera et al. (2001) investigated 1st grade students’ writing performance when using a computerized word processing program vs. handwriting assignments.
  • Using the computer resulted in more sentences and words written than when assignments were handwritten.
  • Cramer and Smith (2002) evaluated whether students’ writing organization and voice/ideas improved with the implementation of technology-rich instruction.
  • The study yielded no statistically significant differences between students in the experimental and control groups.
  • Fran and Orey (2001) looked at how the use of multimedia technology impacted student writing performance.
  • A comparison of pre- and post-test writing composition revealed that students’ participation in a 6-week treatment that incorporated multimedia into writing instruction did not lead to significant improvements; however, students’ motivation towards engaging in the writing process increased.
  • Lowther et al. (2003) examined the impact of using laptops to enhance student writing.
  • The study found that using laptops for writing significantly improved students’ content, organization, and writing style.
  • In a series of 4 studies, Rowley et al. (1998) evaluated the effectiveness of using the Reading and Writing in a Supportive Environment (R-WISE) software   program to improve the prose composition of students.
  • The studies found small gains in the writing composition of students using the word-processing package.
  • The general findings of this review demonstrate that few studies have specifically investigated the effects of using ICTs to improve student writing; thus, more studies in this area are needed.
Categories:
  • Writing
Tags: