Self-Management

Self-management articles use AT to support students with disabilities in independent task completion and independent living skills.

Using video instruction procedures with and without embedded text to teach object labeling ot preschoolers with autism: A preliminary investigation

Sep 16, 2013, 14:09 PM
Reagon, K. A., Higbee, T. S., & Endicott, K. (2007). Using video instruction procedures with and without embedded text to teach object labeling to preschoolers with autism: A preliminary investigation. Journal of Special Education Technology 22(1), 13-20.

Characteristics

  • Three preschool children aged 3-4 with autism participated.

  • This study evaluated the effectiveness of using video instruction to teach young children with autism the labels for common food items.
  • In addition, the study explored the effectiveness of presenting items with and without embedded text.
  • Picture This and Vegas4+DVD Architect software were used to develop the instructional DVD for each participant.

Setting

  • Study sessions were conducted in a university-based preschool classroom.

Method

  • Participants were trained to learn 20 unknown food items over 12-29 sessions using the instructional DVD.

  • Half of the 20 stimulus items were assigned to the no-text condition, while the other half of items were presented with text.

  • For each item on the DVD, participants viewed an image of the food item, were asked “What is it?,” and then were presented with the correct verbal response (with text for items in the embedded text condition).
  • At the end of the video session, a probe condition prompted students to name each item again without any verbal or text prompts.

Results

  • All 3 participants demonstrated that they were able to learn food items after several subsequent trials.
  • One of the 3 participants demonstrated greater mastery of items presented with embedded text, while the other 2 participants demonstrated similar mastery of items in both conditions.
  • Overall, the study results indicate that video instruction can be effectively used to teach some aspects of language to young children with autism.
Categories:
  • Life Skills
Tags:

Transition Planning

Computer Assisted Instruction

Using video instruction procedures with and without embedded text to teach object labeling ot preschoolers with autism: A preliminary investigation

Sep 16, 2013, 14:09 PM
Reagon, K. A., Higbee, T. S., & Endicott, K. (2007). Using video instruction procedures with and without embedded text to teach object labeling to preschoolers with autism: A preliminary investigation. Journal of Special Education Technology 22(1), 13-20.

Characteristics

  • Three preschool children aged 3-4 with autism participated.

  • This study evaluated the effectiveness of using video instruction to teach young children with autism the labels for common food items.
  • In addition, the study explored the effectiveness of presenting items with and without embedded text.
  • Picture This and Vegas4+DVD Architect software were used to develop the instructional DVD for each participant.

Setting

  • Study sessions were conducted in a university-based preschool classroom.

Method

  • Participants were trained to learn 20 unknown food items over 12-29 sessions using the instructional DVD.

  • Half of the 20 stimulus items were assigned to the no-text condition, while the other half of items were presented with text.

  • For each item on the DVD, participants viewed an image of the food item, were asked “What is it?,” and then were presented with the correct verbal response (with text for items in the embedded text condition).
  • At the end of the video session, a probe condition prompted students to name each item again without any verbal or text prompts.

Results

  • All 3 participants demonstrated that they were able to learn food items after several subsequent trials.
  • One of the 3 participants demonstrated greater mastery of items presented with embedded text, while the other 2 participants demonstrated similar mastery of items in both conditions.
  • Overall, the study results indicate that video instruction can be effectively used to teach some aspects of language to young children with autism.
Categories:
  • Life Skills
Tags:

Life Skills

Computer Assisted Instruction

Using video instruction procedures with and without embedded text to teach object labeling ot preschoolers with autism: A preliminary investigation

Sep 16, 2013, 14:09 PM
Reagon, K. A., Higbee, T. S., & Endicott, K. (2007). Using video instruction procedures with and without embedded text to teach object labeling to preschoolers with autism: A preliminary investigation. Journal of Special Education Technology 22(1), 13-20.

Characteristics

  • Three preschool children aged 3-4 with autism participated.

  • This study evaluated the effectiveness of using video instruction to teach young children with autism the labels for common food items.
  • In addition, the study explored the effectiveness of presenting items with and without embedded text.
  • Picture This and Vegas4+DVD Architect software were used to develop the instructional DVD for each participant.

Setting

  • Study sessions were conducted in a university-based preschool classroom.

Method

  • Participants were trained to learn 20 unknown food items over 12-29 sessions using the instructional DVD.

  • Half of the 20 stimulus items were assigned to the no-text condition, while the other half of items were presented with text.

  • For each item on the DVD, participants viewed an image of the food item, were asked “What is it?,” and then were presented with the correct verbal response (with text for items in the embedded text condition).
  • At the end of the video session, a probe condition prompted students to name each item again without any verbal or text prompts.

Results

  • All 3 participants demonstrated that they were able to learn food items after several subsequent trials.
  • One of the 3 participants demonstrated greater mastery of items presented with embedded text, while the other 2 participants demonstrated similar mastery of items in both conditions.
  • Overall, the study results indicate that video instruction can be effectively used to teach some aspects of language to young children with autism.
Categories:
  • Life Skills
Tags: