Self-Management

Self-management articles use AT to support students with disabilities in independent task completion and independent living skills.

Use of computer-based interventions to teach communication skills to children with autism spectrum disorders: A systematic review

Sep 16, 2013, 13:16 PM
Ramdoss, S., Lang, R., Mulloy, A., Franco, J., O’Reilly, M., Didden, R., & Lancioni, G. (2011). Use of Computer-Based Interventions to Teach Communication Skills to Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders: A Systematic Review. Journal of Behavioral Education, 20, 55-76.

Characteristics

  • Grade/Age Level: Age 3-14
  • Specific Difficulty Addressed: Communication skills in students with an autism spectrum disorder (ASD)
  • Type of AT Used: Computer-based interventions (CBI), both researcher designed and mass marketed (e.g., PowerPoint, HyperStudio, IBM Speechwriter, Keytalk, Baldi/Timo, and Alpha Program)

Setting

Method

  •  
  • Articles reviewed were identified through ERIC, Medline, Psychology and Behavioral Sciences Collection, and PsychINFO databases; a review of the reference lists of included articles; and hand searches of journals in which articles had been identified for January-June 2010.
  • Study inclusion criteria required that articles include an intervention study examining the effectiveness of CBI for communication of at least 1 individual with ASD.
  • Exclusion criteria: published prior to 1990, software of high technical virtual reality, studies solely using video modeling, and studies in which the computer was strictly a reinforcer.
  • Articles that met inclusion criteria were categorized by participant characteristics, communication skills targeted, details of CBI, outcomes of intervention, and certainty of evidence.
  • Certainty of evidence was evaluated by research design and methodological details and categorized as “suggestive,” “preponderance,” or “conclusive.”
  • 222 abstracts were initially identified for inclusion and 18 articles met criteria for further inclusion; 10 studies ultimately were included in the review.
  • Software used included both researcher designed and mass marketed packages (PowerPoint, HyperStudio, IBM Speechwriter, Keytalk, Baldi/Timo, and Alpha Program).
  • Across the 10 studies, there were 70 participants ranging in age from 3-14, all diagnosed with autism.

Results

  • Across studies, the repeated-measures-derived effect size was 1.015, with an F-statistic-derived effect size of 3.898, and NAP of 96.6%.
  • Six studies focused on CBI across time for a single group or individual and found improvements in communication.
  • Two studies compared CBI to person-implemented instruction and found CBI to be associated with larger improvements.
  • Two studies inspected the component analyses of CBI programs and found animation was associated with higher scores across lessons than only audio, and when a speech feature of a different program was activated, scores were higher.
  • The certainty of evidences was judged to be conclusive in 2 studies, preponderance in 2 studies, and suggestive in 6 studies.
  • This review indicates that extant literature is limited for CBI use with students with communication impairments due to limitations in the number of participants and the methodological quality of existing studies.
  • Participants in all studies showed improvements, thus this area of intervention shows promise and warrants future research.
Categories:
  • Life Skills
Tags:

Transition Planning

Computer Assisted Instruction

Use of computer-based interventions to teach communication skills to children with autism spectrum disorders: A systematic review

Sep 16, 2013, 13:16 PM
Ramdoss, S., Lang, R., Mulloy, A., Franco, J., O’Reilly, M., Didden, R., & Lancioni, G. (2011). Use of Computer-Based Interventions to Teach Communication Skills to Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders: A Systematic Review. Journal of Behavioral Education, 20, 55-76.

Characteristics

  • Grade/Age Level: Age 3-14
  • Specific Difficulty Addressed: Communication skills in students with an autism spectrum disorder (ASD)
  • Type of AT Used: Computer-based interventions (CBI), both researcher designed and mass marketed (e.g., PowerPoint, HyperStudio, IBM Speechwriter, Keytalk, Baldi/Timo, and Alpha Program)

Setting

Method

  •  
  • Articles reviewed were identified through ERIC, Medline, Psychology and Behavioral Sciences Collection, and PsychINFO databases; a review of the reference lists of included articles; and hand searches of journals in which articles had been identified for January-June 2010.
  • Study inclusion criteria required that articles include an intervention study examining the effectiveness of CBI for communication of at least 1 individual with ASD.
  • Exclusion criteria: published prior to 1990, software of high technical virtual reality, studies solely using video modeling, and studies in which the computer was strictly a reinforcer.
  • Articles that met inclusion criteria were categorized by participant characteristics, communication skills targeted, details of CBI, outcomes of intervention, and certainty of evidence.
  • Certainty of evidence was evaluated by research design and methodological details and categorized as “suggestive,” “preponderance,” or “conclusive.”
  • 222 abstracts were initially identified for inclusion and 18 articles met criteria for further inclusion; 10 studies ultimately were included in the review.
  • Software used included both researcher designed and mass marketed packages (PowerPoint, HyperStudio, IBM Speechwriter, Keytalk, Baldi/Timo, and Alpha Program).
  • Across the 10 studies, there were 70 participants ranging in age from 3-14, all diagnosed with autism.

Results

  • Across studies, the repeated-measures-derived effect size was 1.015, with an F-statistic-derived effect size of 3.898, and NAP of 96.6%.
  • Six studies focused on CBI across time for a single group or individual and found improvements in communication.
  • Two studies compared CBI to person-implemented instruction and found CBI to be associated with larger improvements.
  • Two studies inspected the component analyses of CBI programs and found animation was associated with higher scores across lessons than only audio, and when a speech feature of a different program was activated, scores were higher.
  • The certainty of evidences was judged to be conclusive in 2 studies, preponderance in 2 studies, and suggestive in 6 studies.
  • This review indicates that extant literature is limited for CBI use with students with communication impairments due to limitations in the number of participants and the methodological quality of existing studies.
  • Participants in all studies showed improvements, thus this area of intervention shows promise and warrants future research.
Categories:
  • Life Skills
Tags:

Life Skills

Computer Assisted Instruction

Use of computer-based interventions to teach communication skills to children with autism spectrum disorders: A systematic review

Sep 16, 2013, 13:16 PM
Ramdoss, S., Lang, R., Mulloy, A., Franco, J., O’Reilly, M., Didden, R., & Lancioni, G. (2011). Use of Computer-Based Interventions to Teach Communication Skills to Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders: A Systematic Review. Journal of Behavioral Education, 20, 55-76.

Characteristics

  • Grade/Age Level: Age 3-14
  • Specific Difficulty Addressed: Communication skills in students with an autism spectrum disorder (ASD)
  • Type of AT Used: Computer-based interventions (CBI), both researcher designed and mass marketed (e.g., PowerPoint, HyperStudio, IBM Speechwriter, Keytalk, Baldi/Timo, and Alpha Program)

Setting

Method

  •  
  • Articles reviewed were identified through ERIC, Medline, Psychology and Behavioral Sciences Collection, and PsychINFO databases; a review of the reference lists of included articles; and hand searches of journals in which articles had been identified for January-June 2010.
  • Study inclusion criteria required that articles include an intervention study examining the effectiveness of CBI for communication of at least 1 individual with ASD.
  • Exclusion criteria: published prior to 1990, software of high technical virtual reality, studies solely using video modeling, and studies in which the computer was strictly a reinforcer.
  • Articles that met inclusion criteria were categorized by participant characteristics, communication skills targeted, details of CBI, outcomes of intervention, and certainty of evidence.
  • Certainty of evidence was evaluated by research design and methodological details and categorized as “suggestive,” “preponderance,” or “conclusive.”
  • 222 abstracts were initially identified for inclusion and 18 articles met criteria for further inclusion; 10 studies ultimately were included in the review.
  • Software used included both researcher designed and mass marketed packages (PowerPoint, HyperStudio, IBM Speechwriter, Keytalk, Baldi/Timo, and Alpha Program).
  • Across the 10 studies, there were 70 participants ranging in age from 3-14, all diagnosed with autism.

Results

  • Across studies, the repeated-measures-derived effect size was 1.015, with an F-statistic-derived effect size of 3.898, and NAP of 96.6%.
  • Six studies focused on CBI across time for a single group or individual and found improvements in communication.
  • Two studies compared CBI to person-implemented instruction and found CBI to be associated with larger improvements.
  • Two studies inspected the component analyses of CBI programs and found animation was associated with higher scores across lessons than only audio, and when a speech feature of a different program was activated, scores were higher.
  • The certainty of evidences was judged to be conclusive in 2 studies, preponderance in 2 studies, and suggestive in 6 studies.
  • This review indicates that extant literature is limited for CBI use with students with communication impairments due to limitations in the number of participants and the methodological quality of existing studies.
  • Participants in all studies showed improvements, thus this area of intervention shows promise and warrants future research.
Categories:
  • Life Skills
Tags: