Self-Management

Self-management articles use AT to support students with disabilities in independent task completion and independent living skills.

Improving the sequential time perception of teenagers with mild to moderate mental retardation with 3D immersive virtual reality (IVR)

Sep 16, 2013, 13:06 PM
Passig, D. (2009). Improving the sequential time perception of teenagers with mild to moderate mental retardation with 3D immersive virtual reality (IVR). Journal of Educational Computing Research, 40(3), 263-280.

Characteristics

  • Eighty-seven adolescents (mean age = 14) with mild to moderate mental retardation participated in the study.

  • The study sought to determine whether the concept of sequential time (i.e., the ability to comprehend the sequencing of events, such as today, yesterday, an hour ago, etc.) could be improved in adolescents with mental retardation using a virtual reality intervention.

  • A 3D Immersive Virtual Reality (IVR) program was used in the current study and compared to a 2D program and a no treatment control group.

  • For the IVR condition, students viewed animated color pictures embedded in a story with time sequencing using a head mounted display with a head tracking sensor.

  • The scenarios viewed in both the 2D and 3D conditions were baking a cake, planting a tree, and making chocolate milk.
  • In the 3D condition, students’ movements were taken into account and the program simulated the scenario as though they were the ones completing the tasks.

Setting

  • The study took place in students’ schools located in a metropolitan area in Israel.

Method

  • Participants completed the KABC-II Picture Series subtest as a pre- and post-test measure, which assessed their ability to organize a series of pictures into an appropriate sequence of events.

  • Prior to the intervention phase, students were assigned to one of three groups: the Experimental Group, where they viewed the 3D IVR program; Control Group 1, where they viewed a 2D program with the same animations; and Control Group 2, where they were not involved in either program.

  • The Experimental Group and Control Group 1 viewed the same scenarios, with the only difference being the presentation mode.

  • Each intervention group participant practiced the animated scenarios seven times, with each session lasting no longer than 20 minutes.
  • During each session, the scenario was also presented as a sequential story and then participants were asked to arrange the episodes in the correct sequence.

Results

  • Results revealed that students in the experimental group made significantly larger gains in the pre- and post-test scores on the K-ABC II Picture Series subtest.
  • There was no significant difference between the gains made by Control Group 1 (2D program) participants and the no treatment control group on the subtest.
  • An analysis of participants’ accuracy of sequencing during the intervention revealed that 3D group participants were more accurate in their event sequencing than 2D group participants.
  • In addition, results revealed that students with mild mental retardation were more successful at sequencing events than the students with moderate mental retardation during the study and on pre- and post-test measures.
  • In general, the results demonstrate that 3D virtual reality programs can be used to effectively teach time sequencing to adolescents with mild to moderate mental retardation.
Categories:
  • Life Skills
Tags:

Transition Planning

Computer Assisted Instruction

Improving the sequential time perception of teenagers with mild to moderate mental retardation with 3D immersive virtual reality (IVR)

Sep 16, 2013, 13:06 PM
Passig, D. (2009). Improving the sequential time perception of teenagers with mild to moderate mental retardation with 3D immersive virtual reality (IVR). Journal of Educational Computing Research, 40(3), 263-280.

Characteristics

  • Eighty-seven adolescents (mean age = 14) with mild to moderate mental retardation participated in the study.

  • The study sought to determine whether the concept of sequential time (i.e., the ability to comprehend the sequencing of events, such as today, yesterday, an hour ago, etc.) could be improved in adolescents with mental retardation using a virtual reality intervention.

  • A 3D Immersive Virtual Reality (IVR) program was used in the current study and compared to a 2D program and a no treatment control group.

  • For the IVR condition, students viewed animated color pictures embedded in a story with time sequencing using a head mounted display with a head tracking sensor.

  • The scenarios viewed in both the 2D and 3D conditions were baking a cake, planting a tree, and making chocolate milk.
  • In the 3D condition, students’ movements were taken into account and the program simulated the scenario as though they were the ones completing the tasks.

Setting

  • The study took place in students’ schools located in a metropolitan area in Israel.

Method

  • Participants completed the KABC-II Picture Series subtest as a pre- and post-test measure, which assessed their ability to organize a series of pictures into an appropriate sequence of events.

  • Prior to the intervention phase, students were assigned to one of three groups: the Experimental Group, where they viewed the 3D IVR program; Control Group 1, where they viewed a 2D program with the same animations; and Control Group 2, where they were not involved in either program.

  • The Experimental Group and Control Group 1 viewed the same scenarios, with the only difference being the presentation mode.

  • Each intervention group participant practiced the animated scenarios seven times, with each session lasting no longer than 20 minutes.
  • During each session, the scenario was also presented as a sequential story and then participants were asked to arrange the episodes in the correct sequence.

Results

  • Results revealed that students in the experimental group made significantly larger gains in the pre- and post-test scores on the K-ABC II Picture Series subtest.
  • There was no significant difference between the gains made by Control Group 1 (2D program) participants and the no treatment control group on the subtest.
  • An analysis of participants’ accuracy of sequencing during the intervention revealed that 3D group participants were more accurate in their event sequencing than 2D group participants.
  • In addition, results revealed that students with mild mental retardation were more successful at sequencing events than the students with moderate mental retardation during the study and on pre- and post-test measures.
  • In general, the results demonstrate that 3D virtual reality programs can be used to effectively teach time sequencing to adolescents with mild to moderate mental retardation.
Categories:
  • Life Skills
Tags:

Life Skills

Computer Assisted Instruction

Improving the sequential time perception of teenagers with mild to moderate mental retardation with 3D immersive virtual reality (IVR)

Sep 16, 2013, 13:06 PM
Passig, D. (2009). Improving the sequential time perception of teenagers with mild to moderate mental retardation with 3D immersive virtual reality (IVR). Journal of Educational Computing Research, 40(3), 263-280.

Characteristics

  • Eighty-seven adolescents (mean age = 14) with mild to moderate mental retardation participated in the study.

  • The study sought to determine whether the concept of sequential time (i.e., the ability to comprehend the sequencing of events, such as today, yesterday, an hour ago, etc.) could be improved in adolescents with mental retardation using a virtual reality intervention.

  • A 3D Immersive Virtual Reality (IVR) program was used in the current study and compared to a 2D program and a no treatment control group.

  • For the IVR condition, students viewed animated color pictures embedded in a story with time sequencing using a head mounted display with a head tracking sensor.

  • The scenarios viewed in both the 2D and 3D conditions were baking a cake, planting a tree, and making chocolate milk.
  • In the 3D condition, students’ movements were taken into account and the program simulated the scenario as though they were the ones completing the tasks.

Setting

  • The study took place in students’ schools located in a metropolitan area in Israel.

Method

  • Participants completed the KABC-II Picture Series subtest as a pre- and post-test measure, which assessed their ability to organize a series of pictures into an appropriate sequence of events.

  • Prior to the intervention phase, students were assigned to one of three groups: the Experimental Group, where they viewed the 3D IVR program; Control Group 1, where they viewed a 2D program with the same animations; and Control Group 2, where they were not involved in either program.

  • The Experimental Group and Control Group 1 viewed the same scenarios, with the only difference being the presentation mode.

  • Each intervention group participant practiced the animated scenarios seven times, with each session lasting no longer than 20 minutes.
  • During each session, the scenario was also presented as a sequential story and then participants were asked to arrange the episodes in the correct sequence.

Results

  • Results revealed that students in the experimental group made significantly larger gains in the pre- and post-test scores on the K-ABC II Picture Series subtest.
  • There was no significant difference between the gains made by Control Group 1 (2D program) participants and the no treatment control group on the subtest.
  • An analysis of participants’ accuracy of sequencing during the intervention revealed that 3D group participants were more accurate in their event sequencing than 2D group participants.
  • In addition, results revealed that students with mild mental retardation were more successful at sequencing events than the students with moderate mental retardation during the study and on pre- and post-test measures.
  • In general, the results demonstrate that 3D virtual reality programs can be used to effectively teach time sequencing to adolescents with mild to moderate mental retardation.
Categories:
  • Life Skills
Tags: