Self-Management

Self-management articles use AT to support students with disabilities in independent task completion and independent living skills.

Electronic performance support systems: An assistive technology tool for secondary students with mild disabilities

Sep 16, 2013, 12:55 PM
Mitchem, K., Kight, J., Fitzgerald, G., Koury, K., & Boonseng, T. (2007). Electronic performance support systems: An assistive technology tool for secondary students with mild disabilities. Journal of Special Education Technology, 22(2), 1-14.

Characteristics

  • StrategyTools is an electronic performance support system (EPSS) designed for secondary students that allows users to learn strategies by receiving training, integrating help options, and receiving frequent support so that they are able to access useful tools adapted to their needs.

  • The computer-based program is designed to assist students in developing self-regulation, learning strategies, and transition planning skills using cognitive-behavioral approaches.

  • In order to achieve the above goals, the program provides students with opportunities to use interactive tools in the following categories: getting organized, learning new information, demonstrating learning, working on projects, solving personal problems, and moving into the future.

  • This study aimed to investigate teacher and student perceptions of the usability and effectiveness of StrategyTools when used with secondary students with emotional and behavioral disorders.
  • Four male students (three 9th grade students with behavior disorders and one 11th grade student with Asperger’s Syndrome) and two teachers participated in the study.

Setting

  • The program took place within a self-contained study skills class at a medium-sized high school in West Virginia.

Method

  • The StrategyTools program was used 1-2 times per week for 10 weeks.

    • Students were given 45 minutes at the start of the intervention to become familiar with the program before being prompted to create and use different tools.

    • With teacher support, all students created the following tools throughout the intervention phase: assignment card, to do list, weekly planner, vocabulary card, note taking tool, compare/contraster, KWHL card, study guide, planning a report, big picture card, solving problems, monitoring card, commitment card, making choices, two-party contract, self-awareness tool, action planner, and the transition tool.

    • At least one tool from each broader category was selected based on the needs of the students during the 10 weeks the intervention took place.

    • Throughout the intervention, the teacher recorded field notes on the students’ use of the computer program and their comments about the program.
    • Researchers also conducted semi-structured interviews with each participant, the teacher implementing the intervention, and a second teacher in the school using the program.

    Results

    • Information gathered during student interviews revealed that participants believed that the program allowed them to demonstrate more positive behaviors and skills, and they felt the tool could be used with a broad range of students.
    • Despite their satisfaction with the program, participants rarely used the tools in other situations outside of their study skills class.
    • Data gathered from the teachers indicated that they felt it offered students several useful strategies and was of interest to students since it involved using a highly-interactive computer program; however, they reported that students needed a lot of technical support from them in order to use the tools.
    • The findings provided preliminary evidence for the efficacy of using EPSS programs to enhance the self-regulation skills of students with emotional and behavior disorders.
    Categories:
    • Life Skills
    Tags:

    Transition Planning

    Computer Assisted Instruction

    Electronic performance support systems: An assistive technology tool for secondary students with mild disabilities

    Sep 16, 2013, 12:55 PM
    Mitchem, K., Kight, J., Fitzgerald, G., Koury, K., & Boonseng, T. (2007). Electronic performance support systems: An assistive technology tool for secondary students with mild disabilities. Journal of Special Education Technology, 22(2), 1-14.

    Characteristics

    • StrategyTools is an electronic performance support system (EPSS) designed for secondary students that allows users to learn strategies by receiving training, integrating help options, and receiving frequent support so that they are able to access useful tools adapted to their needs.

    • The computer-based program is designed to assist students in developing self-regulation, learning strategies, and transition planning skills using cognitive-behavioral approaches.

    • In order to achieve the above goals, the program provides students with opportunities to use interactive tools in the following categories: getting organized, learning new information, demonstrating learning, working on projects, solving personal problems, and moving into the future.

    • This study aimed to investigate teacher and student perceptions of the usability and effectiveness of StrategyTools when used with secondary students with emotional and behavioral disorders.
    • Four male students (three 9th grade students with behavior disorders and one 11th grade student with Asperger’s Syndrome) and two teachers participated in the study.

    Setting

    • The program took place within a self-contained study skills class at a medium-sized high school in West Virginia.

    Method

    • The StrategyTools program was used 1-2 times per week for 10 weeks.

      • Students were given 45 minutes at the start of the intervention to become familiar with the program before being prompted to create and use different tools.

      • With teacher support, all students created the following tools throughout the intervention phase: assignment card, to do list, weekly planner, vocabulary card, note taking tool, compare/contraster, KWHL card, study guide, planning a report, big picture card, solving problems, monitoring card, commitment card, making choices, two-party contract, self-awareness tool, action planner, and the transition tool.

      • At least one tool from each broader category was selected based on the needs of the students during the 10 weeks the intervention took place.

      • Throughout the intervention, the teacher recorded field notes on the students’ use of the computer program and their comments about the program.
      • Researchers also conducted semi-structured interviews with each participant, the teacher implementing the intervention, and a second teacher in the school using the program.

      Results

      • Information gathered during student interviews revealed that participants believed that the program allowed them to demonstrate more positive behaviors and skills, and they felt the tool could be used with a broad range of students.
      • Despite their satisfaction with the program, participants rarely used the tools in other situations outside of their study skills class.
      • Data gathered from the teachers indicated that they felt it offered students several useful strategies and was of interest to students since it involved using a highly-interactive computer program; however, they reported that students needed a lot of technical support from them in order to use the tools.
      • The findings provided preliminary evidence for the efficacy of using EPSS programs to enhance the self-regulation skills of students with emotional and behavior disorders.
      Categories:
      • Life Skills
      Tags:

      Life Skills

      Computer Assisted Instruction

      Electronic performance support systems: An assistive technology tool for secondary students with mild disabilities

      Sep 16, 2013, 12:55 PM
      Mitchem, K., Kight, J., Fitzgerald, G., Koury, K., & Boonseng, T. (2007). Electronic performance support systems: An assistive technology tool for secondary students with mild disabilities. Journal of Special Education Technology, 22(2), 1-14.

      Characteristics

      • StrategyTools is an electronic performance support system (EPSS) designed for secondary students that allows users to learn strategies by receiving training, integrating help options, and receiving frequent support so that they are able to access useful tools adapted to their needs.

      • The computer-based program is designed to assist students in developing self-regulation, learning strategies, and transition planning skills using cognitive-behavioral approaches.

      • In order to achieve the above goals, the program provides students with opportunities to use interactive tools in the following categories: getting organized, learning new information, demonstrating learning, working on projects, solving personal problems, and moving into the future.

      • This study aimed to investigate teacher and student perceptions of the usability and effectiveness of StrategyTools when used with secondary students with emotional and behavioral disorders.
      • Four male students (three 9th grade students with behavior disorders and one 11th grade student with Asperger’s Syndrome) and two teachers participated in the study.

      Setting

      • The program took place within a self-contained study skills class at a medium-sized high school in West Virginia.

      Method

      • The StrategyTools program was used 1-2 times per week for 10 weeks.

        • Students were given 45 minutes at the start of the intervention to become familiar with the program before being prompted to create and use different tools.

        • With teacher support, all students created the following tools throughout the intervention phase: assignment card, to do list, weekly planner, vocabulary card, note taking tool, compare/contraster, KWHL card, study guide, planning a report, big picture card, solving problems, monitoring card, commitment card, making choices, two-party contract, self-awareness tool, action planner, and the transition tool.

        • At least one tool from each broader category was selected based on the needs of the students during the 10 weeks the intervention took place.

        • Throughout the intervention, the teacher recorded field notes on the students’ use of the computer program and their comments about the program.
        • Researchers also conducted semi-structured interviews with each participant, the teacher implementing the intervention, and a second teacher in the school using the program.

        Results

        • Information gathered during student interviews revealed that participants believed that the program allowed them to demonstrate more positive behaviors and skills, and they felt the tool could be used with a broad range of students.
        • Despite their satisfaction with the program, participants rarely used the tools in other situations outside of their study skills class.
        • Data gathered from the teachers indicated that they felt it offered students several useful strategies and was of interest to students since it involved using a highly-interactive computer program; however, they reported that students needed a lot of technical support from them in order to use the tools.
        • The findings provided preliminary evidence for the efficacy of using EPSS programs to enhance the self-regulation skills of students with emotional and behavior disorders.
        Categories:
        • Life Skills
        Tags: