Self-Management

Self-management articles use AT to support students with disabilities in independent task completion and independent living skills.

Using a personal digital assistant to increase independent task completion by students with autism spectrum disorder

Sep 16, 2013, 14:06 PM
Mechling, L.C., Gast, D.L., & Seid, N.H. (2009). Using a Personal Digital Assistant to Increase Independent Task Completion by Students with Autism Spectrum Disorder. Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, 39(10), 1420-1434.

Characteristics

  • Grade/Age Level: 3 male high school students (ages 17-6, 16-4, 17-10)
  • Specific Difficulty Addressed: Self-prompting in students with autism spectrum disorder
  • Type of AT Used: PDA with picture, auditory and video prompts

Setting

  • This study was conducted in a high school home living room used for life skills instruction.

Method

  • The PDA used was a Cyrano Communicator™
  • The prompting program had a picture in the upper portion of the display. When the picture was touched, audio instructions would be played. In the lower left corner of the display was a movie icon, which would play a video clip of instructions when touched. In the bottom right corner was an arrow icon which would play the audio instruction of “next” when touched and move the program to the next set of instructions. Task analyses for the three recipes ranged from 19 to 25 steps.
  • A multiple probe design was replicated across 3 participants.
  • 1 cooking recipe was presented each session during 1 session per day 3-4 days per week.
  • A least to most prompt system was used: picture; picture + auditory; video+- voice over.

Results

  • There was immediate improvement across 3 recipes after introduction of the PDA.
  • Maintenance of recipe completion was found with PDA use.
  • Self adjustment of prompt level was seen across and within recipes.
  • Social validity was assessed at the end of the study by presenting and teaching the students how to use a portable DVD player and a picture cookbook to complete recipes. One student chose the PDA, while the other two choose the portable DVD player (even though they had not used the video prompt).
  • The PDA with a least to most prompt system can be effectively used with ASD students to complete multi-step procedures.
Categories:
  • Life Skills
Tags:

Transition Planning

Computer Assisted Instruction

Using a personal digital assistant to increase independent task completion by students with autism spectrum disorder

Sep 16, 2013, 14:06 PM
Mechling, L.C., Gast, D.L., & Seid, N.H. (2009). Using a Personal Digital Assistant to Increase Independent Task Completion by Students with Autism Spectrum Disorder. Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, 39(10), 1420-1434.

Characteristics

  • Grade/Age Level: 3 male high school students (ages 17-6, 16-4, 17-10)
  • Specific Difficulty Addressed: Self-prompting in students with autism spectrum disorder
  • Type of AT Used: PDA with picture, auditory and video prompts

Setting

  • This study was conducted in a high school home living room used for life skills instruction.

Method

  • The PDA used was a Cyrano Communicator™
  • The prompting program had a picture in the upper portion of the display. When the picture was touched, audio instructions would be played. In the lower left corner of the display was a movie icon, which would play a video clip of instructions when touched. In the bottom right corner was an arrow icon which would play the audio instruction of “next” when touched and move the program to the next set of instructions. Task analyses for the three recipes ranged from 19 to 25 steps.
  • A multiple probe design was replicated across 3 participants.
  • 1 cooking recipe was presented each session during 1 session per day 3-4 days per week.
  • A least to most prompt system was used: picture; picture + auditory; video+- voice over.

Results

  • There was immediate improvement across 3 recipes after introduction of the PDA.
  • Maintenance of recipe completion was found with PDA use.
  • Self adjustment of prompt level was seen across and within recipes.
  • Social validity was assessed at the end of the study by presenting and teaching the students how to use a portable DVD player and a picture cookbook to complete recipes. One student chose the PDA, while the other two choose the portable DVD player (even though they had not used the video prompt).
  • The PDA with a least to most prompt system can be effectively used with ASD students to complete multi-step procedures.
Categories:
  • Life Skills
Tags:

Life Skills

Computer Assisted Instruction

Using a personal digital assistant to increase independent task completion by students with autism spectrum disorder

Sep 16, 2013, 14:06 PM
Mechling, L.C., Gast, D.L., & Seid, N.H. (2009). Using a Personal Digital Assistant to Increase Independent Task Completion by Students with Autism Spectrum Disorder. Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, 39(10), 1420-1434.

Characteristics

  • Grade/Age Level: 3 male high school students (ages 17-6, 16-4, 17-10)
  • Specific Difficulty Addressed: Self-prompting in students with autism spectrum disorder
  • Type of AT Used: PDA with picture, auditory and video prompts

Setting

  • This study was conducted in a high school home living room used for life skills instruction.

Method

  • The PDA used was a Cyrano Communicator™
  • The prompting program had a picture in the upper portion of the display. When the picture was touched, audio instructions would be played. In the lower left corner of the display was a movie icon, which would play a video clip of instructions when touched. In the bottom right corner was an arrow icon which would play the audio instruction of “next” when touched and move the program to the next set of instructions. Task analyses for the three recipes ranged from 19 to 25 steps.
  • A multiple probe design was replicated across 3 participants.
  • 1 cooking recipe was presented each session during 1 session per day 3-4 days per week.
  • A least to most prompt system was used: picture; picture + auditory; video+- voice over.

Results

  • There was immediate improvement across 3 recipes after introduction of the PDA.
  • Maintenance of recipe completion was found with PDA use.
  • Self adjustment of prompt level was seen across and within recipes.
  • Social validity was assessed at the end of the study by presenting and teaching the students how to use a portable DVD player and a picture cookbook to complete recipes. One student chose the PDA, while the other two choose the portable DVD player (even though they had not used the video prompt).
  • The PDA with a least to most prompt system can be effectively used with ASD students to complete multi-step procedures.
Categories:
  • Life Skills
Tags: