Self-Management

Self-management articles use AT to support students with disabilities in independent task completion and independent living skills.

The effect of instructor-created video programs to teach students with disabilities: A literature review

Sep 16, 2013, 12:45 PM
Mechling, L. (2005). The effect of instructor-created video programs to teach students with disabilities: A literature review. Journal of Special Education Technology, 20(2), 25-36.

Characteristics

  • This article reviewed 24 studies which used videotape modeling and instruction with students with disabilities.
  • Within the studies reviewed, 45.8% included students with mental retardation, 54.2% included students with autism, 12.55% included students with emotional and behavior disorders, 8.3% included students with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, 4.2% included students with learning disabilities, and 4.2% included students with physical disabilities.

  • The procedures used within the studies include: video feedback, video modeling, video self-modeling, subjective point of view, interactive video instruction/video prompting, and computer-based video instruction.

Setting

  • All studies reviewed took place in educational/training settings.

Method

  • The author conducted a review of articles pertaining to videotape instruction with students with disabilities through an electronic and manual search of journals published between 1999 and 2003.

 

Results

Video Feedback Studies

  • The 4 studies in this category used replaying videos of students as an opportunity for students to view their performances, and allowed them to evaluate their performance and plan for their future responses to similar scenarios based on the feedback received.
  • Three of the studies demonstrated that students with mild mental retardation were able to learn socially appropriate behaviors.
  • The fourth study demonstrated that students with autism were able to increase their social communication skills.

Video Modeling Studies

  • The 6 video modeling studies involved having participants watch a video of a same-age peer or adult modeling a skill appropriately and later imitating the observed skill.
  • All of the studies included student participants with autism.
  • In general, the findings of these studies suggested that video modeling is an effective way to teach variety of skills to students with autism, is often a highly reinforcing activity for students who enjoy watching television, and led to the generalizability of skills to other settings and situations.

Video Self-Modeling Studies

  • The 3 video self-modeling studies had participants view themselves performing a skill at a more advanced level than is typical for the participants.
  • The technique was generally found to be effective in increasing the communication skills of children with autism and increasing spontaneous responding to questions or requests in young children.
  • However, this review suggested that the effectiveness of the procedure will likely vary depending on the demands of the target skill and the age and ability of the student.

Subjective Point of View Studies

  • The 2 studies using subjective point of view had participants watch a video that was recorded from their point of view or eye level so that they felt as though they were the one performing the skill.
  • The technique proved to be an effective method for allowing students to view future events (e.g., going to the mall) in order to increase the predictability of the event and reduce the anxiety or behavior difficulties that often accompany the transition to unfamiliar settings or activities for students with autism.

Interactive Video Instruction/Video Prompting Studies

  • Three studies used interactive video instruction in order to elicit a particular immediate response from the student(s) viewing the video; thus, this technique involves having students watch a portion of a video segment and attempt to perform the desired skill.
  • If students are unable to perform the skill, the segment can be repeated until the skill is performed and students are ready to move onto the next segment of the video.
  • The studies reviewed demonstrated that the technique was effective at: increasing student’s acquisition of grocery-related sight words, teaching community-based skills to students with moderate mental retardation, and teaching self-help skills to young children with mental retardation.

Computer-Based Video Instruction

  • The 7 studies utilizing computer-based video instruction involved teaching skills to students by combining several forms of media into one computerized, interactive program.
  • Although the components and purposes of each study using the technique varied, the studies generally concluded that the technique is cost effective, efficient, and provides students with more opportunities for review and practice than they would receive in traditional community-based programs.
  • In summary, this literature review provided evidence that video programs can be effective tools for increasing independence and skill acquisition among students with disabilities.
Categories:
  • Life Skills
Tags:

Transition Planning

Computer Assisted Instruction

The effect of instructor-created video programs to teach students with disabilities: A literature review

Sep 16, 2013, 12:45 PM
Mechling, L. (2005). The effect of instructor-created video programs to teach students with disabilities: A literature review. Journal of Special Education Technology, 20(2), 25-36.

Characteristics

  • This article reviewed 24 studies which used videotape modeling and instruction with students with disabilities.
  • Within the studies reviewed, 45.8% included students with mental retardation, 54.2% included students with autism, 12.55% included students with emotional and behavior disorders, 8.3% included students with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, 4.2% included students with learning disabilities, and 4.2% included students with physical disabilities.

  • The procedures used within the studies include: video feedback, video modeling, video self-modeling, subjective point of view, interactive video instruction/video prompting, and computer-based video instruction.

Setting

  • All studies reviewed took place in educational/training settings.

Method

  • The author conducted a review of articles pertaining to videotape instruction with students with disabilities through an electronic and manual search of journals published between 1999 and 2003.

 

Results

Video Feedback Studies

  • The 4 studies in this category used replaying videos of students as an opportunity for students to view their performances, and allowed them to evaluate their performance and plan for their future responses to similar scenarios based on the feedback received.
  • Three of the studies demonstrated that students with mild mental retardation were able to learn socially appropriate behaviors.
  • The fourth study demonstrated that students with autism were able to increase their social communication skills.

Video Modeling Studies

  • The 6 video modeling studies involved having participants watch a video of a same-age peer or adult modeling a skill appropriately and later imitating the observed skill.
  • All of the studies included student participants with autism.
  • In general, the findings of these studies suggested that video modeling is an effective way to teach variety of skills to students with autism, is often a highly reinforcing activity for students who enjoy watching television, and led to the generalizability of skills to other settings and situations.

Video Self-Modeling Studies

  • The 3 video self-modeling studies had participants view themselves performing a skill at a more advanced level than is typical for the participants.
  • The technique was generally found to be effective in increasing the communication skills of children with autism and increasing spontaneous responding to questions or requests in young children.
  • However, this review suggested that the effectiveness of the procedure will likely vary depending on the demands of the target skill and the age and ability of the student.

Subjective Point of View Studies

  • The 2 studies using subjective point of view had participants watch a video that was recorded from their point of view or eye level so that they felt as though they were the one performing the skill.
  • The technique proved to be an effective method for allowing students to view future events (e.g., going to the mall) in order to increase the predictability of the event and reduce the anxiety or behavior difficulties that often accompany the transition to unfamiliar settings or activities for students with autism.

Interactive Video Instruction/Video Prompting Studies

  • Three studies used interactive video instruction in order to elicit a particular immediate response from the student(s) viewing the video; thus, this technique involves having students watch a portion of a video segment and attempt to perform the desired skill.
  • If students are unable to perform the skill, the segment can be repeated until the skill is performed and students are ready to move onto the next segment of the video.
  • The studies reviewed demonstrated that the technique was effective at: increasing student’s acquisition of grocery-related sight words, teaching community-based skills to students with moderate mental retardation, and teaching self-help skills to young children with mental retardation.

Computer-Based Video Instruction

  • The 7 studies utilizing computer-based video instruction involved teaching skills to students by combining several forms of media into one computerized, interactive program.
  • Although the components and purposes of each study using the technique varied, the studies generally concluded that the technique is cost effective, efficient, and provides students with more opportunities for review and practice than they would receive in traditional community-based programs.
  • In summary, this literature review provided evidence that video programs can be effective tools for increasing independence and skill acquisition among students with disabilities.
Categories:
  • Life Skills
Tags:

Life Skills

Computer Assisted Instruction

The effect of instructor-created video programs to teach students with disabilities: A literature review

Sep 16, 2013, 12:45 PM
Mechling, L. (2005). The effect of instructor-created video programs to teach students with disabilities: A literature review. Journal of Special Education Technology, 20(2), 25-36.

Characteristics

  • This article reviewed 24 studies which used videotape modeling and instruction with students with disabilities.
  • Within the studies reviewed, 45.8% included students with mental retardation, 54.2% included students with autism, 12.55% included students with emotional and behavior disorders, 8.3% included students with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, 4.2% included students with learning disabilities, and 4.2% included students with physical disabilities.

  • The procedures used within the studies include: video feedback, video modeling, video self-modeling, subjective point of view, interactive video instruction/video prompting, and computer-based video instruction.

Setting

  • All studies reviewed took place in educational/training settings.

Method

  • The author conducted a review of articles pertaining to videotape instruction with students with disabilities through an electronic and manual search of journals published between 1999 and 2003.

 

Results

Video Feedback Studies

  • The 4 studies in this category used replaying videos of students as an opportunity for students to view their performances, and allowed them to evaluate their performance and plan for their future responses to similar scenarios based on the feedback received.
  • Three of the studies demonstrated that students with mild mental retardation were able to learn socially appropriate behaviors.
  • The fourth study demonstrated that students with autism were able to increase their social communication skills.

Video Modeling Studies

  • The 6 video modeling studies involved having participants watch a video of a same-age peer or adult modeling a skill appropriately and later imitating the observed skill.
  • All of the studies included student participants with autism.
  • In general, the findings of these studies suggested that video modeling is an effective way to teach variety of skills to students with autism, is often a highly reinforcing activity for students who enjoy watching television, and led to the generalizability of skills to other settings and situations.

Video Self-Modeling Studies

  • The 3 video self-modeling studies had participants view themselves performing a skill at a more advanced level than is typical for the participants.
  • The technique was generally found to be effective in increasing the communication skills of children with autism and increasing spontaneous responding to questions or requests in young children.
  • However, this review suggested that the effectiveness of the procedure will likely vary depending on the demands of the target skill and the age and ability of the student.

Subjective Point of View Studies

  • The 2 studies using subjective point of view had participants watch a video that was recorded from their point of view or eye level so that they felt as though they were the one performing the skill.
  • The technique proved to be an effective method for allowing students to view future events (e.g., going to the mall) in order to increase the predictability of the event and reduce the anxiety or behavior difficulties that often accompany the transition to unfamiliar settings or activities for students with autism.

Interactive Video Instruction/Video Prompting Studies

  • Three studies used interactive video instruction in order to elicit a particular immediate response from the student(s) viewing the video; thus, this technique involves having students watch a portion of a video segment and attempt to perform the desired skill.
  • If students are unable to perform the skill, the segment can be repeated until the skill is performed and students are ready to move onto the next segment of the video.
  • The studies reviewed demonstrated that the technique was effective at: increasing student’s acquisition of grocery-related sight words, teaching community-based skills to students with moderate mental retardation, and teaching self-help skills to young children with mental retardation.

Computer-Based Video Instruction

  • The 7 studies utilizing computer-based video instruction involved teaching skills to students by combining several forms of media into one computerized, interactive program.
  • Although the components and purposes of each study using the technique varied, the studies generally concluded that the technique is cost effective, efficient, and provides students with more opportunities for review and practice than they would receive in traditional community-based programs.
  • In summary, this literature review provided evidence that video programs can be effective tools for increasing independence and skill acquisition among students with disabilities.
Categories:
  • Life Skills
Tags: