Self-Management

Self-management articles use AT to support students with disabilities in independent task completion and independent living skills.

Computer-based video instruction to teach students with intellectual disabilities to verbally respond to questions and make purchases in fast food restaurants

Aug 9, 2013, 08:20 AM
Mechling, L. C., Pridgen, L. S., & Cronin, B. A. (2005). Computer-based video instruction to teach students with intellectual disabilities to verbally respond to questions and make purchases in fast food restaurants. Education and Training in Developmental Disabilities, 40(1), 47-59.

Characteristics

  • Two male students and one female student (ages 17-20) with moderate to severe intellectual disabilities participated in the study.
  • This study examined the effectiveness of using computer-based video instruction to improve the functional skills of students with intellectual disabilities.
  • More specifically, this study examined whether the use of computer-based video instruction improved students’ responses to fast food restaurant cashiers and improved the number of correct steps students were able to employ when ordering food.
  • Students watched simulations of fast food restaurant interactions on the computer that included video captions, photographs, and voice recordings.

Setting

  • The study took place at the students’ high school and 3 local fast food restaurants.

Method

  • During the baseline phase, students were taken to 3 fast food restaurants to determine their comfort with verbally placing orders and following the steps for visiting a fast food restaurant.
  • During the intervention phase, students received instruction using the computer program 1-2 times each day for 4-5 days each week.
  • The computer program provided video clips of fast food employees asking the questions required to place an order.
  • There was a pause between clips so participants could provide the correct response either verbally or by pointing to a correct picture displayed on the computer.
  • The instructor kept track of the number of unprompted correct, unprompted incorrect, prompted correct, and prompted incorrect answers participants made.
  • Students continued to view the computer based instructional program until they “performed” fast food tasks during the simulation with 100% accuracy for 4 out of 5 trials.
  • After each student completed the intervention phase, they participated in 3 generalization probes at local fast food restaurants and returned to the restaurants at a later date in order to examine their maintenance of the target behaviors.

Results

  • Each student was able to learn the correct verbal and motor skills required to order meals at three fast food restaurants.
  • Although students were able to order 3 basic items during generalization session, they often made errors by rejecting items suggested by the cashier, cancelled items, and incorrectly named items.
  • Overall, the findings do suggest that computer-based video instruction may be used to teach fast food ordering skills to high school students with intellectual disabilities.
Categories:
  • Life Skills
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Transition Planning

Computer Assisted Instruction

Computer-based video instruction to teach students with intellectual disabilities to verbally respond to questions and make purchases in fast food restaurants

Aug 9, 2013, 08:20 AM
Mechling, L. C., Pridgen, L. S., & Cronin, B. A. (2005). Computer-based video instruction to teach students with intellectual disabilities to verbally respond to questions and make purchases in fast food restaurants. Education and Training in Developmental Disabilities, 40(1), 47-59.

Characteristics

  • Two male students and one female student (ages 17-20) with moderate to severe intellectual disabilities participated in the study.
  • This study examined the effectiveness of using computer-based video instruction to improve the functional skills of students with intellectual disabilities.
  • More specifically, this study examined whether the use of computer-based video instruction improved students’ responses to fast food restaurant cashiers and improved the number of correct steps students were able to employ when ordering food.
  • Students watched simulations of fast food restaurant interactions on the computer that included video captions, photographs, and voice recordings.

Setting

  • The study took place at the students’ high school and 3 local fast food restaurants.

Method

  • During the baseline phase, students were taken to 3 fast food restaurants to determine their comfort with verbally placing orders and following the steps for visiting a fast food restaurant.
  • During the intervention phase, students received instruction using the computer program 1-2 times each day for 4-5 days each week.
  • The computer program provided video clips of fast food employees asking the questions required to place an order.
  • There was a pause between clips so participants could provide the correct response either verbally or by pointing to a correct picture displayed on the computer.
  • The instructor kept track of the number of unprompted correct, unprompted incorrect, prompted correct, and prompted incorrect answers participants made.
  • Students continued to view the computer based instructional program until they “performed” fast food tasks during the simulation with 100% accuracy for 4 out of 5 trials.
  • After each student completed the intervention phase, they participated in 3 generalization probes at local fast food restaurants and returned to the restaurants at a later date in order to examine their maintenance of the target behaviors.

Results

  • Each student was able to learn the correct verbal and motor skills required to order meals at three fast food restaurants.
  • Although students were able to order 3 basic items during generalization session, they often made errors by rejecting items suggested by the cashier, cancelled items, and incorrectly named items.
  • Overall, the findings do suggest that computer-based video instruction may be used to teach fast food ordering skills to high school students with intellectual disabilities.
Categories:
  • Life Skills
Tags:

Life Skills

Computer Assisted Instruction

Computer-based video instruction to teach students with intellectual disabilities to verbally respond to questions and make purchases in fast food restaurants

Aug 9, 2013, 08:20 AM
Mechling, L. C., Pridgen, L. S., & Cronin, B. A. (2005). Computer-based video instruction to teach students with intellectual disabilities to verbally respond to questions and make purchases in fast food restaurants. Education and Training in Developmental Disabilities, 40(1), 47-59.

Characteristics

  • Two male students and one female student (ages 17-20) with moderate to severe intellectual disabilities participated in the study.
  • This study examined the effectiveness of using computer-based video instruction to improve the functional skills of students with intellectual disabilities.
  • More specifically, this study examined whether the use of computer-based video instruction improved students’ responses to fast food restaurant cashiers and improved the number of correct steps students were able to employ when ordering food.
  • Students watched simulations of fast food restaurant interactions on the computer that included video captions, photographs, and voice recordings.

Setting

  • The study took place at the students’ high school and 3 local fast food restaurants.

Method

  • During the baseline phase, students were taken to 3 fast food restaurants to determine their comfort with verbally placing orders and following the steps for visiting a fast food restaurant.
  • During the intervention phase, students received instruction using the computer program 1-2 times each day for 4-5 days each week.
  • The computer program provided video clips of fast food employees asking the questions required to place an order.
  • There was a pause between clips so participants could provide the correct response either verbally or by pointing to a correct picture displayed on the computer.
  • The instructor kept track of the number of unprompted correct, unprompted incorrect, prompted correct, and prompted incorrect answers participants made.
  • Students continued to view the computer based instructional program until they “performed” fast food tasks during the simulation with 100% accuracy for 4 out of 5 trials.
  • After each student completed the intervention phase, they participated in 3 generalization probes at local fast food restaurants and returned to the restaurants at a later date in order to examine their maintenance of the target behaviors.

Results

  • Each student was able to learn the correct verbal and motor skills required to order meals at three fast food restaurants.
  • Although students were able to order 3 basic items during generalization session, they often made errors by rejecting items suggested by the cashier, cancelled items, and incorrectly named items.
  • Overall, the findings do suggest that computer-based video instruction may be used to teach fast food ordering skills to high school students with intellectual disabilities.
Categories:
  • Life Skills
Tags: