Self-Management

Self-management articles use AT to support students with disabilities in independent task completion and independent living skills.

Providing hearing-impaired students with learning care after classes through smart phones and the GPRS network

Sep 16, 2013, 13:10 PM
Liu, C-C., & Hong, Y-C. (2007). Providing hearing-impaired students with learning care after classes through smart phones and the GPRS network. British Journal of Educational Technology, 38(4), 727-741.

Characteristics

  • Children with hearing impairments are at-risk for underachievement due to a myriad of factors with one of the most important being more limited exposure to opportunities to learn throughout their life in comparison to non hearing impaired individuals.

  • Previous studies have attempted to improve student motivation by providing reminders and assistance via after-school phone calls; however, this option is not effective for hearing impaired students.

  • This study examined the impact of using after-school wireless communications to smart phones to enhance the learning of Taiwanese students with hearing impairments.

  • More specifically, the researchers wanted to determine if after-school wireless communications from teachers improve student learning activities at home and whether students’ parents are supportive of the technique.
  • This study followed a junior high school teacher in Taiwan’s after-school communications with 6 hearing impaired students.

Setting

Method

  •  

    Each participant was provided with after-school support from the teacher via the after-class interaction system.

  • The system allowed students to see their in-class participation online, included a feature where they could chat and communicate with teachers, and provided students with motivating prompts to probe learning and encourage student work completion.

     

     

  • The data and messages were delivered to students via smart phones, which allowed students to send and receive messages from any location.

  • Prompts provided by the teachers included: asking if they had completed homework, sending reminders, confirming homework answers, offering assistance, providing praise/rewards, and encouraging task completion.

  • The program trial lasted 5 weeks.

  • Students attended in-class math lectures twice a week and then were given the opportunity to interact with the teacher via smart phone on Tuesday and Friday nights.

  • Students’ parents completed a 10 question survey after the trial phase ended.

Results

  • Students homework completion rate rose from 70.7% prior to the program trial to 90.2%.
  • During the trial, teacher prompts for students to complete homework resulted in 79% of the students immediately completing their homework.
  • Students required assistance with homework problems 38 times, and were able to correctly solve 87% of the problems after receiving teacher assistance through their smart phones.
  • The teacher provided praise to students 274 times during the 5 week trial.
  • Eighty-three percent of parents believed the system improved their children’s math knowledge, believed it increased their children’s communication capacity, and approved of the system components.
  • Some parents worried that their children might use the smart phone for other purposes when left unsupervised, but most parents indicated that they hoped their children would be able to continue to use the system.
  • Overall, the study results indicate that the smart phone system extended the teacher’s ability to provide instruction, increased the communication networks of hearing impaired students, and was generally an acceptable program to students’ families.
Categories:
  • Life Skills
Tags:

Transition Planning

Computer Assisted Instruction

Providing hearing-impaired students with learning care after classes through smart phones and the GPRS network

Sep 16, 2013, 13:10 PM
Liu, C-C., & Hong, Y-C. (2007). Providing hearing-impaired students with learning care after classes through smart phones and the GPRS network. British Journal of Educational Technology, 38(4), 727-741.

Characteristics

  • Children with hearing impairments are at-risk for underachievement due to a myriad of factors with one of the most important being more limited exposure to opportunities to learn throughout their life in comparison to non hearing impaired individuals.

  • Previous studies have attempted to improve student motivation by providing reminders and assistance via after-school phone calls; however, this option is not effective for hearing impaired students.

  • This study examined the impact of using after-school wireless communications to smart phones to enhance the learning of Taiwanese students with hearing impairments.

  • More specifically, the researchers wanted to determine if after-school wireless communications from teachers improve student learning activities at home and whether students’ parents are supportive of the technique.
  • This study followed a junior high school teacher in Taiwan’s after-school communications with 6 hearing impaired students.

Setting

Method

  •  

    Each participant was provided with after-school support from the teacher via the after-class interaction system.

  • The system allowed students to see their in-class participation online, included a feature where they could chat and communicate with teachers, and provided students with motivating prompts to probe learning and encourage student work completion.

     

     

  • The data and messages were delivered to students via smart phones, which allowed students to send and receive messages from any location.

  • Prompts provided by the teachers included: asking if they had completed homework, sending reminders, confirming homework answers, offering assistance, providing praise/rewards, and encouraging task completion.

  • The program trial lasted 5 weeks.

  • Students attended in-class math lectures twice a week and then were given the opportunity to interact with the teacher via smart phone on Tuesday and Friday nights.

  • Students’ parents completed a 10 question survey after the trial phase ended.

Results

  • Students homework completion rate rose from 70.7% prior to the program trial to 90.2%.
  • During the trial, teacher prompts for students to complete homework resulted in 79% of the students immediately completing their homework.
  • Students required assistance with homework problems 38 times, and were able to correctly solve 87% of the problems after receiving teacher assistance through their smart phones.
  • The teacher provided praise to students 274 times during the 5 week trial.
  • Eighty-three percent of parents believed the system improved their children’s math knowledge, believed it increased their children’s communication capacity, and approved of the system components.
  • Some parents worried that their children might use the smart phone for other purposes when left unsupervised, but most parents indicated that they hoped their children would be able to continue to use the system.
  • Overall, the study results indicate that the smart phone system extended the teacher’s ability to provide instruction, increased the communication networks of hearing impaired students, and was generally an acceptable program to students’ families.
Categories:
  • Life Skills
Tags:

Life Skills

Computer Assisted Instruction

Providing hearing-impaired students with learning care after classes through smart phones and the GPRS network

Sep 16, 2013, 13:10 PM
Liu, C-C., & Hong, Y-C. (2007). Providing hearing-impaired students with learning care after classes through smart phones and the GPRS network. British Journal of Educational Technology, 38(4), 727-741.

Characteristics

  • Children with hearing impairments are at-risk for underachievement due to a myriad of factors with one of the most important being more limited exposure to opportunities to learn throughout their life in comparison to non hearing impaired individuals.

  • Previous studies have attempted to improve student motivation by providing reminders and assistance via after-school phone calls; however, this option is not effective for hearing impaired students.

  • This study examined the impact of using after-school wireless communications to smart phones to enhance the learning of Taiwanese students with hearing impairments.

  • More specifically, the researchers wanted to determine if after-school wireless communications from teachers improve student learning activities at home and whether students’ parents are supportive of the technique.
  • This study followed a junior high school teacher in Taiwan’s after-school communications with 6 hearing impaired students.

Setting

Method

  •  

    Each participant was provided with after-school support from the teacher via the after-class interaction system.

  • The system allowed students to see their in-class participation online, included a feature where they could chat and communicate with teachers, and provided students with motivating prompts to probe learning and encourage student work completion.

     

     

  • The data and messages were delivered to students via smart phones, which allowed students to send and receive messages from any location.

  • Prompts provided by the teachers included: asking if they had completed homework, sending reminders, confirming homework answers, offering assistance, providing praise/rewards, and encouraging task completion.

  • The program trial lasted 5 weeks.

  • Students attended in-class math lectures twice a week and then were given the opportunity to interact with the teacher via smart phone on Tuesday and Friday nights.

  • Students’ parents completed a 10 question survey after the trial phase ended.

Results

  • Students homework completion rate rose from 70.7% prior to the program trial to 90.2%.
  • During the trial, teacher prompts for students to complete homework resulted in 79% of the students immediately completing their homework.
  • Students required assistance with homework problems 38 times, and were able to correctly solve 87% of the problems after receiving teacher assistance through their smart phones.
  • The teacher provided praise to students 274 times during the 5 week trial.
  • Eighty-three percent of parents believed the system improved their children’s math knowledge, believed it increased their children’s communication capacity, and approved of the system components.
  • Some parents worried that their children might use the smart phone for other purposes when left unsupervised, but most parents indicated that they hoped their children would be able to continue to use the system.
  • Overall, the study results indicate that the smart phone system extended the teacher’s ability to provide instruction, increased the communication networks of hearing impaired students, and was generally an acceptable program to students’ families.
Categories:
  • Life Skills
Tags: