Self-Management

Self-management articles use AT to support students with disabilities in independent task completion and independent living skills.

Effects of a computerized program on use of the test-taking strategy by secondary students with disabilities

Sep 16, 2013, 12:48 PM
Lancaster, P. E., Schumaker, J. B., Lancaster, S. J. C., & Deshler, D. D. (2009). Effects of a computerized program on use of the test-taking strategy by secondary students with disabilities. Learning Disability Quarterly, 32(3), 165-179.

Characteristics

  • Fifty-two junior high students with learning disabilities and 60 senior high students with learning disabilities participated in the study.

  • -This study used an experimental group design to determine the effectiveness of using the Test-Taking Strategy CD to teach test-taking techniques to adolescents with learning disabilities.

  • The Test-Taking Strategy program includes 7 steps: (1) preparing to succeed, (2) reading and underlining important directions, (3) reading each question carefully and eliminating incorrect choices, (4) answering or temporarily skipping items, (5) answering previously skipped items unless they still do not know the answer, (6) making logical guesses on remaining items, and (7) surveying all answers to make sure every item is answered.
  • The CD-version of the Test-Taking Strategy involved presenting the above steps using modeling, verbal practice, and controlled practice with immediate feedback.

Setting

  • This study took place in the computer labs of one junior high school and one senior high school located in small Midwestern towns.

Method

  • Students were divided into experimental and control groups.

    • All students took a strategy use, strategy knowledge, and metacognitive pretest.

    • Students in the experimental groups used the Test-Taking Strategy CD for 4, 30-minute to 45-minute sessions.

    • Those in the experimental groups also completed quizzes as a part of the computerized program.

    • After completing all training sessions, experimental group participants took a practice test assessing their mastery of the program and were required to review relevant portions of the program if they scored below 90% mastery.

    • Students in the control group worked on a computerized program that taught self-advocacy skills for the same amount of time students in the experimental group used the Test-Taking Strategy CD.

    • After completing the software training, students in all groups completed posttest strategy use, strategy knowledge, and metacognitve measures.
    • Students in the experimental group also completed an interview and satisfaction questionnaire.

    Results

    • Students in the experimental group made significantly greater gains on measures of strategy use, metacognitive skills, and strategy knowledge.
    • In addition, students in the experimental group reported being “somewhat satisfied” to “very satisfied” with the program.
    • Both junior high and senior high students reported that the practice activities, quizzes, and video clips were the most helpful components of the program.
    • Overall, the results of this study demonstrate the utility of using the Test-Taking Strategy CD to improve the test-taking skills of adolescents with learning disabilities.
    Categories:
    • Life Skills
    Tags:

    Transition Planning

    Computer Assisted Instruction

    Effects of a computerized program on use of the test-taking strategy by secondary students with disabilities

    Sep 16, 2013, 12:48 PM
    Lancaster, P. E., Schumaker, J. B., Lancaster, S. J. C., & Deshler, D. D. (2009). Effects of a computerized program on use of the test-taking strategy by secondary students with disabilities. Learning Disability Quarterly, 32(3), 165-179.

    Characteristics

    • Fifty-two junior high students with learning disabilities and 60 senior high students with learning disabilities participated in the study.

    • -This study used an experimental group design to determine the effectiveness of using the Test-Taking Strategy CD to teach test-taking techniques to adolescents with learning disabilities.

    • The Test-Taking Strategy program includes 7 steps: (1) preparing to succeed, (2) reading and underlining important directions, (3) reading each question carefully and eliminating incorrect choices, (4) answering or temporarily skipping items, (5) answering previously skipped items unless they still do not know the answer, (6) making logical guesses on remaining items, and (7) surveying all answers to make sure every item is answered.
    • The CD-version of the Test-Taking Strategy involved presenting the above steps using modeling, verbal practice, and controlled practice with immediate feedback.

    Setting

    • This study took place in the computer labs of one junior high school and one senior high school located in small Midwestern towns.

    Method

    • Students were divided into experimental and control groups.

      • All students took a strategy use, strategy knowledge, and metacognitive pretest.

      • Students in the experimental groups used the Test-Taking Strategy CD for 4, 30-minute to 45-minute sessions.

      • Those in the experimental groups also completed quizzes as a part of the computerized program.

      • After completing all training sessions, experimental group participants took a practice test assessing their mastery of the program and were required to review relevant portions of the program if they scored below 90% mastery.

      • Students in the control group worked on a computerized program that taught self-advocacy skills for the same amount of time students in the experimental group used the Test-Taking Strategy CD.

      • After completing the software training, students in all groups completed posttest strategy use, strategy knowledge, and metacognitve measures.
      • Students in the experimental group also completed an interview and satisfaction questionnaire.

      Results

      • Students in the experimental group made significantly greater gains on measures of strategy use, metacognitive skills, and strategy knowledge.
      • In addition, students in the experimental group reported being “somewhat satisfied” to “very satisfied” with the program.
      • Both junior high and senior high students reported that the practice activities, quizzes, and video clips were the most helpful components of the program.
      • Overall, the results of this study demonstrate the utility of using the Test-Taking Strategy CD to improve the test-taking skills of adolescents with learning disabilities.
      Categories:
      • Life Skills
      Tags:

      Life Skills

      Computer Assisted Instruction

      Effects of a computerized program on use of the test-taking strategy by secondary students with disabilities

      Sep 16, 2013, 12:48 PM
      Lancaster, P. E., Schumaker, J. B., Lancaster, S. J. C., & Deshler, D. D. (2009). Effects of a computerized program on use of the test-taking strategy by secondary students with disabilities. Learning Disability Quarterly, 32(3), 165-179.

      Characteristics

      • Fifty-two junior high students with learning disabilities and 60 senior high students with learning disabilities participated in the study.

      • -This study used an experimental group design to determine the effectiveness of using the Test-Taking Strategy CD to teach test-taking techniques to adolescents with learning disabilities.

      • The Test-Taking Strategy program includes 7 steps: (1) preparing to succeed, (2) reading and underlining important directions, (3) reading each question carefully and eliminating incorrect choices, (4) answering or temporarily skipping items, (5) answering previously skipped items unless they still do not know the answer, (6) making logical guesses on remaining items, and (7) surveying all answers to make sure every item is answered.
      • The CD-version of the Test-Taking Strategy involved presenting the above steps using modeling, verbal practice, and controlled practice with immediate feedback.

      Setting

      • This study took place in the computer labs of one junior high school and one senior high school located in small Midwestern towns.

      Method

      • Students were divided into experimental and control groups.

        • All students took a strategy use, strategy knowledge, and metacognitive pretest.

        • Students in the experimental groups used the Test-Taking Strategy CD for 4, 30-minute to 45-minute sessions.

        • Those in the experimental groups also completed quizzes as a part of the computerized program.

        • After completing all training sessions, experimental group participants took a practice test assessing their mastery of the program and were required to review relevant portions of the program if they scored below 90% mastery.

        • Students in the control group worked on a computerized program that taught self-advocacy skills for the same amount of time students in the experimental group used the Test-Taking Strategy CD.

        • After completing the software training, students in all groups completed posttest strategy use, strategy knowledge, and metacognitve measures.
        • Students in the experimental group also completed an interview and satisfaction questionnaire.

        Results

        • Students in the experimental group made significantly greater gains on measures of strategy use, metacognitive skills, and strategy knowledge.
        • In addition, students in the experimental group reported being “somewhat satisfied” to “very satisfied” with the program.
        • Both junior high and senior high students reported that the practice activities, quizzes, and video clips were the most helpful components of the program.
        • Overall, the results of this study demonstrate the utility of using the Test-Taking Strategy CD to improve the test-taking skills of adolescents with learning disabilities.
        Categories:
        • Life Skills
        Tags: