Self-Management

Self-management articles use AT to support students with disabilities in independent task completion and independent living skills.

The efficacy of an interactive hypermedia program for teaching a test-taking strategy to students with high incidence disabilities

Sep 16, 2013, 12:51 PM
Lancaster, P. E., Lancaster, S. J. C., Schumaker, J. B., & Deschler, D. D. (2006). The efficacy of an interactive hypermedia program for teaching a test-taking strategy to students with high incidence disabilities. Journal of Special Education Technology, 21(2), 17-30.

Characteristics

  • Fifteen secondary students with learning disabilities participated in the study, which investigated the effectiveness of an Interactive Hypermedia (IH) called the Test-Taking Strategy in increasing the students’ test-taking skills.

    • Interactive Hypermedia (IH) is computer program including multiple visual and audio components that responds to the user by providing specific, individualized feedback and controls the learner’s progression through the software based upon the learner’s responses.
    • The strategies taught in the Test-Taking Strategy program included: a detailed description of each step in a strategy, video clips of students modeling the use of the strategies, memorization activities to learn the steps, activities that allowed students to practice individual steps and whole strategies, and quizzes to check for understanding.

    Setting

    • The study took place in the computer lab of the students’ high school located in an urban, Midwestern city.

    Method

    • Participants took three or more tests aimed at evaluating their baseline levels of test-taking strategy use and a strategy knowledge test to assess their awareness of possible test-taking strategies.

    • During the intervention phase, students completed the Test-Taking Strategy software program over a period of 3 to 5, 30-45 minute sessions.
    • After completing the program, students took two additional strategy-use tests, a strategy knowledge test, completed an interview about their use of the program, and took a satisfaction questionnaire.

    Results

    • Participants made large gains on the post-intervention strategy-use tests, scoring an average of 42% on the baseline measure and an average of 93% on the pos-intervention measure.
    • Before participating in the intervention, students were able to describe 5 test-taking strategies/steps, but were able to describe 7 steps/subtests after the intervention.
    • Participants also made large gains on the post-intervention strategy knowledge test.
    • In addition, all students reported being at least “somewhat satisfied” with the program’s components.
    • Overall, this study demonstrated that the Test-Taking Strategy CD can effectively teach high school students with learning disabilities the components of effective test-taking skills.
    Categories:
    • Life Skills
    Tags:

    Transition Planning

    Computer Assisted Instruction

    The efficacy of an interactive hypermedia program for teaching a test-taking strategy to students with high incidence disabilities

    Sep 16, 2013, 12:51 PM
    Lancaster, P. E., Lancaster, S. J. C., Schumaker, J. B., & Deschler, D. D. (2006). The efficacy of an interactive hypermedia program for teaching a test-taking strategy to students with high incidence disabilities. Journal of Special Education Technology, 21(2), 17-30.

    Characteristics

    • Fifteen secondary students with learning disabilities participated in the study, which investigated the effectiveness of an Interactive Hypermedia (IH) called the Test-Taking Strategy in increasing the students’ test-taking skills.

      • Interactive Hypermedia (IH) is computer program including multiple visual and audio components that responds to the user by providing specific, individualized feedback and controls the learner’s progression through the software based upon the learner’s responses.
      • The strategies taught in the Test-Taking Strategy program included: a detailed description of each step in a strategy, video clips of students modeling the use of the strategies, memorization activities to learn the steps, activities that allowed students to practice individual steps and whole strategies, and quizzes to check for understanding.

      Setting

      • The study took place in the computer lab of the students’ high school located in an urban, Midwestern city.

      Method

      • Participants took three or more tests aimed at evaluating their baseline levels of test-taking strategy use and a strategy knowledge test to assess their awareness of possible test-taking strategies.

      • During the intervention phase, students completed the Test-Taking Strategy software program over a period of 3 to 5, 30-45 minute sessions.
      • After completing the program, students took two additional strategy-use tests, a strategy knowledge test, completed an interview about their use of the program, and took a satisfaction questionnaire.

      Results

      • Participants made large gains on the post-intervention strategy-use tests, scoring an average of 42% on the baseline measure and an average of 93% on the pos-intervention measure.
      • Before participating in the intervention, students were able to describe 5 test-taking strategies/steps, but were able to describe 7 steps/subtests after the intervention.
      • Participants also made large gains on the post-intervention strategy knowledge test.
      • In addition, all students reported being at least “somewhat satisfied” with the program’s components.
      • Overall, this study demonstrated that the Test-Taking Strategy CD can effectively teach high school students with learning disabilities the components of effective test-taking skills.
      Categories:
      • Life Skills
      Tags:

      Life Skills

      Computer Assisted Instruction

      The efficacy of an interactive hypermedia program for teaching a test-taking strategy to students with high incidence disabilities

      Sep 16, 2013, 12:51 PM
      Lancaster, P. E., Lancaster, S. J. C., Schumaker, J. B., & Deschler, D. D. (2006). The efficacy of an interactive hypermedia program for teaching a test-taking strategy to students with high incidence disabilities. Journal of Special Education Technology, 21(2), 17-30.

      Characteristics

      • Fifteen secondary students with learning disabilities participated in the study, which investigated the effectiveness of an Interactive Hypermedia (IH) called the Test-Taking Strategy in increasing the students’ test-taking skills.

        • Interactive Hypermedia (IH) is computer program including multiple visual and audio components that responds to the user by providing specific, individualized feedback and controls the learner’s progression through the software based upon the learner’s responses.
        • The strategies taught in the Test-Taking Strategy program included: a detailed description of each step in a strategy, video clips of students modeling the use of the strategies, memorization activities to learn the steps, activities that allowed students to practice individual steps and whole strategies, and quizzes to check for understanding.

        Setting

        • The study took place in the computer lab of the students’ high school located in an urban, Midwestern city.

        Method

        • Participants took three or more tests aimed at evaluating their baseline levels of test-taking strategy use and a strategy knowledge test to assess their awareness of possible test-taking strategies.

        • During the intervention phase, students completed the Test-Taking Strategy software program over a period of 3 to 5, 30-45 minute sessions.
        • After completing the program, students took two additional strategy-use tests, a strategy knowledge test, completed an interview about their use of the program, and took a satisfaction questionnaire.

        Results

        • Participants made large gains on the post-intervention strategy-use tests, scoring an average of 42% on the baseline measure and an average of 93% on the pos-intervention measure.
        • Before participating in the intervention, students were able to describe 5 test-taking strategies/steps, but were able to describe 7 steps/subtests after the intervention.
        • Participants also made large gains on the post-intervention strategy knowledge test.
        • In addition, all students reported being at least “somewhat satisfied” with the program’s components.
        • Overall, this study demonstrated that the Test-Taking Strategy CD can effectively teach high school students with learning disabilities the components of effective test-taking skills.
        Categories:
        • Life Skills
        Tags: