Self-Management

Self-management articles use AT to support students with disabilities in independent task completion and independent living skills.

Using assistive technology to teach emotion recognition to students with Asperger syndrome: A pilot study

Sep 16, 2013, 13:19 PM
Lacava, P. G., Golan, O., Baron-Cohen, S., & Myles, B. S. (2007). Using assistive technology to teach emotion recognition to students with Asperger syndrome: A pilot study. Remedial and Special Education, 28(3), 174-181.

Characteristics

  • Past research has demonstrated that individuals with autism spectrum disorders, including Asperger Syndrome, often have difficulty with emotional recognition.

  • This study explored the use of Mind Reading: The Interactive Guide to Emotions, a multimedia computer program, to improve the emotion recognition skills of children with Asperger Syndrome.

  • Eight children aged 8-11 with Asperger Syndrome participated in the study.

  • The Mind Reading software program has several games, a learning center, and an emotions library, which includes over 400 photos, movie clips, and audio clips of emotions.
  • Program users can gather rewards by completing the lessons and quizzes included in the game.

Setting

  • The study took place in participants’ homes or schools located in the Midwestern U.S.

Method

  • Participants’ emotional recognition skills were assessed prior to and after participating in the computer program intervention using the Cambridge Mindreading Face-Voice Battery for Children, the Child Feature-Based Auditory Task, and the Reading the Mind in Films Test—Children’s Version.

  • While participants were completing pretest measures, the parents of students who would be implementing the intervention at home were given a demo of the Mind Reading program, taught how to navigate the program’s components at home, and instructed on how to use the Mind Reading manager, which allowed them to change the program’s settings and monitor the child’s progress.

  • The same demo was given to the school staff of participants that opted to complete the intervention at school.

  • Students had the opportunity to use the software for at least 10 weeks.

  • Participants were instructed to spend no more than 33% of their time playing games, but were otherwise free to use the program as they wished.
  • After 10 weeks, and an average of 10.5 hours using the software program, the researchers collected data from each participant and completed the post-intervention assessments.

Results

  • Participants demonstrated significantly higher emotion recognition scores on all 3 measures after participating in the intervention.
  • The results indicate that Mind Reading was effective in improving the emotion recognition skills of school-aged children with Asperger Syndrome.
  • In addition, its effectiveness in both home and school settings suggests that it can be used as part of a school curriculum or supplemental instruction within students’ homes.
Categories:
  • Life Skills
Tags:

Transition Planning

Computer Assisted Instruction

Using assistive technology to teach emotion recognition to students with Asperger syndrome: A pilot study

Sep 16, 2013, 13:19 PM
Lacava, P. G., Golan, O., Baron-Cohen, S., & Myles, B. S. (2007). Using assistive technology to teach emotion recognition to students with Asperger syndrome: A pilot study. Remedial and Special Education, 28(3), 174-181.

Characteristics

  • Past research has demonstrated that individuals with autism spectrum disorders, including Asperger Syndrome, often have difficulty with emotional recognition.

  • This study explored the use of Mind Reading: The Interactive Guide to Emotions, a multimedia computer program, to improve the emotion recognition skills of children with Asperger Syndrome.

  • Eight children aged 8-11 with Asperger Syndrome participated in the study.

  • The Mind Reading software program has several games, a learning center, and an emotions library, which includes over 400 photos, movie clips, and audio clips of emotions.
  • Program users can gather rewards by completing the lessons and quizzes included in the game.

Setting

  • The study took place in participants’ homes or schools located in the Midwestern U.S.

Method

  • Participants’ emotional recognition skills were assessed prior to and after participating in the computer program intervention using the Cambridge Mindreading Face-Voice Battery for Children, the Child Feature-Based Auditory Task, and the Reading the Mind in Films Test—Children’s Version.

  • While participants were completing pretest measures, the parents of students who would be implementing the intervention at home were given a demo of the Mind Reading program, taught how to navigate the program’s components at home, and instructed on how to use the Mind Reading manager, which allowed them to change the program’s settings and monitor the child’s progress.

  • The same demo was given to the school staff of participants that opted to complete the intervention at school.

  • Students had the opportunity to use the software for at least 10 weeks.

  • Participants were instructed to spend no more than 33% of their time playing games, but were otherwise free to use the program as they wished.
  • After 10 weeks, and an average of 10.5 hours using the software program, the researchers collected data from each participant and completed the post-intervention assessments.

Results

  • Participants demonstrated significantly higher emotion recognition scores on all 3 measures after participating in the intervention.
  • The results indicate that Mind Reading was effective in improving the emotion recognition skills of school-aged children with Asperger Syndrome.
  • In addition, its effectiveness in both home and school settings suggests that it can be used as part of a school curriculum or supplemental instruction within students’ homes.
Categories:
  • Life Skills
Tags:

Life Skills

Computer Assisted Instruction

Using assistive technology to teach emotion recognition to students with Asperger syndrome: A pilot study

Sep 16, 2013, 13:19 PM
Lacava, P. G., Golan, O., Baron-Cohen, S., & Myles, B. S. (2007). Using assistive technology to teach emotion recognition to students with Asperger syndrome: A pilot study. Remedial and Special Education, 28(3), 174-181.

Characteristics

  • Past research has demonstrated that individuals with autism spectrum disorders, including Asperger Syndrome, often have difficulty with emotional recognition.

  • This study explored the use of Mind Reading: The Interactive Guide to Emotions, a multimedia computer program, to improve the emotion recognition skills of children with Asperger Syndrome.

  • Eight children aged 8-11 with Asperger Syndrome participated in the study.

  • The Mind Reading software program has several games, a learning center, and an emotions library, which includes over 400 photos, movie clips, and audio clips of emotions.
  • Program users can gather rewards by completing the lessons and quizzes included in the game.

Setting

  • The study took place in participants’ homes or schools located in the Midwestern U.S.

Method

  • Participants’ emotional recognition skills were assessed prior to and after participating in the computer program intervention using the Cambridge Mindreading Face-Voice Battery for Children, the Child Feature-Based Auditory Task, and the Reading the Mind in Films Test—Children’s Version.

  • While participants were completing pretest measures, the parents of students who would be implementing the intervention at home were given a demo of the Mind Reading program, taught how to navigate the program’s components at home, and instructed on how to use the Mind Reading manager, which allowed them to change the program’s settings and monitor the child’s progress.

  • The same demo was given to the school staff of participants that opted to complete the intervention at school.

  • Students had the opportunity to use the software for at least 10 weeks.

  • Participants were instructed to spend no more than 33% of their time playing games, but were otherwise free to use the program as they wished.
  • After 10 weeks, and an average of 10.5 hours using the software program, the researchers collected data from each participant and completed the post-intervention assessments.

Results

  • Participants demonstrated significantly higher emotion recognition scores on all 3 measures after participating in the intervention.
  • The results indicate that Mind Reading was effective in improving the emotion recognition skills of school-aged children with Asperger Syndrome.
  • In addition, its effectiveness in both home and school settings suggests that it can be used as part of a school curriculum or supplemental instruction within students’ homes.
Categories:
  • Life Skills
Tags: