Self-Management

Self-management articles use AT to support students with disabilities in independent task completion and independent living skills.

Effects of a 21st-century curriculum on students' information technology and transition skills

Jul 8, 2013, 13:29 PM
Izzo, M. V., Yurick, A., Nagaraja, H. N., & Novak, J. A. (2010). Effects of a 21st-Century curriculum on students’ information technology and transition skills. Career Development for Exceptional Individuals, 33(2), 95-105.

Characteristics

  • This study sought to investigate the effects of using EnvisionIT, a web-based curriculum, on increasing high school students with disabilities’ information technology skills as they relate to postsecondary transition planning.
  • Two hundred eighty-seven high school students, including 119 students with disabilities, participated in the study.
  • The study aimed to use the EnvisionIT program to teach information technology, which has been labeled as one of the 21st-century skills (i.e., instruction in English, math, science, history, foreign language, self-direction, productivity, social skills, cultural awareness, and information technology skills) that young adults need as they transition to postsecondary life.
  • EnvisonIT is a program created by the U.S. Office of Special Education Programs that teaches high school students relevant skills such as completing online college applications and job applications.
  • The authors hypothesized that students with and without disabilities who participated in the EnvisionIT intervention would make greater gains in information technology skills and score better on an assessment of transition-readiness than students that did not participate in the intervention.

Setting

  • The study took place in high schools located in rural, suburban, and urban Ohio.

 

Method

  • One hundred fifty-three students from 7 classrooms were assigned to the experimental condition, while 134 students from 8 other classrooms served as control participants.
  • All participants completed The Information Technology Literacy Survey (IT-Lit), 2 8th grade AIMSweb Maze reading passages, and the Ohio State University Career Survey as pre- and post-test measures.
  •  

    Teachers in experimental classrooms participated in a day long workshop on the EnvisionIT curriculum prior to implementing the program in their classrooms.

  • -After the training, teachers were able to flexibly integrate the EnvisionIT curriculum into their daily/weekly classroom routines so that students could all proceed through the 10-unit curriculum.

  • Several fidelity observations were conducted in each classroom.

Results

  • There were significant differences between the intervention participants and control participants’ IT literacy and transition-readiness even after controlling for factors including disability, reading level, and school setting.
  • Intervention participants with disabilities outperformed control participants with disabilities on gains made in IT literacy and knowledge about finding jobs, goal setting, and researching colleges.
  • Intervention participants without disabilities outperformed control participants without disabilities on measures of IT literacy and their knowledge of where to find jobs.

  • The findings demonstrate that the EnvisionIT curriculum can be used to enhance the information technology and transition-readiness skills of students with and without disabilities.
Categories:
  • Transition Planning
Tags:

Transition Planning

Computer Assisted Instruction

Effects of a 21st-century curriculum on students' information technology and transition skills

Jul 8, 2013, 13:29 PM
Izzo, M. V., Yurick, A., Nagaraja, H. N., & Novak, J. A. (2010). Effects of a 21st-Century curriculum on students’ information technology and transition skills. Career Development for Exceptional Individuals, 33(2), 95-105.

Characteristics

  • This study sought to investigate the effects of using EnvisionIT, a web-based curriculum, on increasing high school students with disabilities’ information technology skills as they relate to postsecondary transition planning.
  • Two hundred eighty-seven high school students, including 119 students with disabilities, participated in the study.
  • The study aimed to use the EnvisionIT program to teach information technology, which has been labeled as one of the 21st-century skills (i.e., instruction in English, math, science, history, foreign language, self-direction, productivity, social skills, cultural awareness, and information technology skills) that young adults need as they transition to postsecondary life.
  • EnvisonIT is a program created by the U.S. Office of Special Education Programs that teaches high school students relevant skills such as completing online college applications and job applications.
  • The authors hypothesized that students with and without disabilities who participated in the EnvisionIT intervention would make greater gains in information technology skills and score better on an assessment of transition-readiness than students that did not participate in the intervention.

Setting

  • The study took place in high schools located in rural, suburban, and urban Ohio.

 

Method

  • One hundred fifty-three students from 7 classrooms were assigned to the experimental condition, while 134 students from 8 other classrooms served as control participants.
  • All participants completed The Information Technology Literacy Survey (IT-Lit), 2 8th grade AIMSweb Maze reading passages, and the Ohio State University Career Survey as pre- and post-test measures.
  •  

    Teachers in experimental classrooms participated in a day long workshop on the EnvisionIT curriculum prior to implementing the program in their classrooms.

  • -After the training, teachers were able to flexibly integrate the EnvisionIT curriculum into their daily/weekly classroom routines so that students could all proceed through the 10-unit curriculum.

  • Several fidelity observations were conducted in each classroom.

Results

  • There were significant differences between the intervention participants and control participants’ IT literacy and transition-readiness even after controlling for factors including disability, reading level, and school setting.
  • Intervention participants with disabilities outperformed control participants with disabilities on gains made in IT literacy and knowledge about finding jobs, goal setting, and researching colleges.
  • Intervention participants without disabilities outperformed control participants without disabilities on measures of IT literacy and their knowledge of where to find jobs.

  • The findings demonstrate that the EnvisionIT curriculum can be used to enhance the information technology and transition-readiness skills of students with and without disabilities.
Categories:
  • Transition Planning
Tags:

Life Skills

Computer Assisted Instruction

Effects of a 21st-century curriculum on students' information technology and transition skills

Jul 8, 2013, 13:29 PM
Izzo, M. V., Yurick, A., Nagaraja, H. N., & Novak, J. A. (2010). Effects of a 21st-Century curriculum on students’ information technology and transition skills. Career Development for Exceptional Individuals, 33(2), 95-105.

Characteristics

  • This study sought to investigate the effects of using EnvisionIT, a web-based curriculum, on increasing high school students with disabilities’ information technology skills as they relate to postsecondary transition planning.
  • Two hundred eighty-seven high school students, including 119 students with disabilities, participated in the study.
  • The study aimed to use the EnvisionIT program to teach information technology, which has been labeled as one of the 21st-century skills (i.e., instruction in English, math, science, history, foreign language, self-direction, productivity, social skills, cultural awareness, and information technology skills) that young adults need as they transition to postsecondary life.
  • EnvisonIT is a program created by the U.S. Office of Special Education Programs that teaches high school students relevant skills such as completing online college applications and job applications.
  • The authors hypothesized that students with and without disabilities who participated in the EnvisionIT intervention would make greater gains in information technology skills and score better on an assessment of transition-readiness than students that did not participate in the intervention.

Setting

  • The study took place in high schools located in rural, suburban, and urban Ohio.

 

Method

  • One hundred fifty-three students from 7 classrooms were assigned to the experimental condition, while 134 students from 8 other classrooms served as control participants.
  • All participants completed The Information Technology Literacy Survey (IT-Lit), 2 8th grade AIMSweb Maze reading passages, and the Ohio State University Career Survey as pre- and post-test measures.
  •  

    Teachers in experimental classrooms participated in a day long workshop on the EnvisionIT curriculum prior to implementing the program in their classrooms.

  • -After the training, teachers were able to flexibly integrate the EnvisionIT curriculum into their daily/weekly classroom routines so that students could all proceed through the 10-unit curriculum.

  • Several fidelity observations were conducted in each classroom.

Results

  • There were significant differences between the intervention participants and control participants’ IT literacy and transition-readiness even after controlling for factors including disability, reading level, and school setting.
  • Intervention participants with disabilities outperformed control participants with disabilities on gains made in IT literacy and knowledge about finding jobs, goal setting, and researching colleges.
  • Intervention participants without disabilities outperformed control participants without disabilities on measures of IT literacy and their knowledge of where to find jobs.

  • The findings demonstrate that the EnvisionIT curriculum can be used to enhance the information technology and transition-readiness skills of students with and without disabilities.
Categories:
  • Transition Planning
Tags: