Self-Management

Self-management articles use AT to support students with disabilities in independent task completion and independent living skills.

Teaching grocery store purchasing skills to students with intellectual disabilities using a computer-based instruction program

Sep 16, 2013, 13:13 PM
Hansen, D. L., & Morgan, R. L. (2008). Teaching grocery store purchasing skills to students with intellectual disabilities using a computer-based instruction program. Education and Training in Developmental Disabilities, 43(4), 431-442.

Characteristics

  • This study sought to teach grocery store purchasing skills to secondary students with intellectual disabilities.

  • Three male high school students (aged 16-17) with intellectual disabilities participated in the study.

  • Students used the Project Shop DVD program and accompanying computer based virtual shopping game and assessments in order to learn how to purchase items in a grocery store.
  • The program provided 3, 10-minute video models of correct and incorrect grocery purchasing skills, and an interactive CD-ROM that included instruction and skill practice.

Setting

  • The study took place in the students’ high school computer lab, their classroom, and local grocery stores in Utah.

Method

  • Throughout the study, participants’ ability to perform 5 steps (i.e., selection of shortest line/express lane, placement of items on conveyor belt, make a correct payment, choose paper or plastic bag, and collect change, receipt, and groceries) was evaluated during baseline grocery store probes, intervention assessments, final grocery store probes, and a 30 day follow up.

  • During the baseline condition, students were taken to a grocery store to evaluate their purchasing skills prior to being introduced to Project Shop.

  • Grocery store probes continued once a week during the intervention phase.

  • During the intervention phase, students viewed the 3 video models each week and used the CD-ROM instructional program 4-5 times each week for 30 minutes.

  • After completing the intervention phase, students were taken to 3 new grocery stores to complete the same grocery store tasks.

  • Students returned to the initial grocery store after 30 days to determine their maintenance of purchasing skills.
  • Participants’ parents also rated students’ grocery purchasing skills prior to and after completing the study.

Results

  • Participants demonstrated 60%-100% accuracy on the computer-based assessment by the end of the intervention.
  • During the baseline grocery store-based probe, students were able to perform few, if any, of the step in purchasing items; however, they were able to perform with 100% accuracy by the end of the computer based instruction phase.
  • During the generalization probes conducted at 3 different grocery stores, one participant purchased items with 80% accuracy while the other two participants purchased items with 100% accuracy.
  • Students were able to maintain the acquired skills with 100% accuracy after 30 days.
  • In addition, parents rated their children’s purchasing skills higher during the posttest administration of the questionnaire.
  • The findings indicate that computer based instruction may be used to increase the purchasing skills of secondary students with intellectual disabilities.
Categories:
  • Life Skills
Tags:

Transition Planning

Computer Assisted Instruction

Teaching grocery store purchasing skills to students with intellectual disabilities using a computer-based instruction program

Sep 16, 2013, 13:13 PM
Hansen, D. L., & Morgan, R. L. (2008). Teaching grocery store purchasing skills to students with intellectual disabilities using a computer-based instruction program. Education and Training in Developmental Disabilities, 43(4), 431-442.

Characteristics

  • This study sought to teach grocery store purchasing skills to secondary students with intellectual disabilities.

  • Three male high school students (aged 16-17) with intellectual disabilities participated in the study.

  • Students used the Project Shop DVD program and accompanying computer based virtual shopping game and assessments in order to learn how to purchase items in a grocery store.
  • The program provided 3, 10-minute video models of correct and incorrect grocery purchasing skills, and an interactive CD-ROM that included instruction and skill practice.

Setting

  • The study took place in the students’ high school computer lab, their classroom, and local grocery stores in Utah.

Method

  • Throughout the study, participants’ ability to perform 5 steps (i.e., selection of shortest line/express lane, placement of items on conveyor belt, make a correct payment, choose paper or plastic bag, and collect change, receipt, and groceries) was evaluated during baseline grocery store probes, intervention assessments, final grocery store probes, and a 30 day follow up.

  • During the baseline condition, students were taken to a grocery store to evaluate their purchasing skills prior to being introduced to Project Shop.

  • Grocery store probes continued once a week during the intervention phase.

  • During the intervention phase, students viewed the 3 video models each week and used the CD-ROM instructional program 4-5 times each week for 30 minutes.

  • After completing the intervention phase, students were taken to 3 new grocery stores to complete the same grocery store tasks.

  • Students returned to the initial grocery store after 30 days to determine their maintenance of purchasing skills.
  • Participants’ parents also rated students’ grocery purchasing skills prior to and after completing the study.

Results

  • Participants demonstrated 60%-100% accuracy on the computer-based assessment by the end of the intervention.
  • During the baseline grocery store-based probe, students were able to perform few, if any, of the step in purchasing items; however, they were able to perform with 100% accuracy by the end of the computer based instruction phase.
  • During the generalization probes conducted at 3 different grocery stores, one participant purchased items with 80% accuracy while the other two participants purchased items with 100% accuracy.
  • Students were able to maintain the acquired skills with 100% accuracy after 30 days.
  • In addition, parents rated their children’s purchasing skills higher during the posttest administration of the questionnaire.
  • The findings indicate that computer based instruction may be used to increase the purchasing skills of secondary students with intellectual disabilities.
Categories:
  • Life Skills
Tags:

Life Skills

Computer Assisted Instruction

Teaching grocery store purchasing skills to students with intellectual disabilities using a computer-based instruction program

Sep 16, 2013, 13:13 PM
Hansen, D. L., & Morgan, R. L. (2008). Teaching grocery store purchasing skills to students with intellectual disabilities using a computer-based instruction program. Education and Training in Developmental Disabilities, 43(4), 431-442.

Characteristics

  • This study sought to teach grocery store purchasing skills to secondary students with intellectual disabilities.

  • Three male high school students (aged 16-17) with intellectual disabilities participated in the study.

  • Students used the Project Shop DVD program and accompanying computer based virtual shopping game and assessments in order to learn how to purchase items in a grocery store.
  • The program provided 3, 10-minute video models of correct and incorrect grocery purchasing skills, and an interactive CD-ROM that included instruction and skill practice.

Setting

  • The study took place in the students’ high school computer lab, their classroom, and local grocery stores in Utah.

Method

  • Throughout the study, participants’ ability to perform 5 steps (i.e., selection of shortest line/express lane, placement of items on conveyor belt, make a correct payment, choose paper or plastic bag, and collect change, receipt, and groceries) was evaluated during baseline grocery store probes, intervention assessments, final grocery store probes, and a 30 day follow up.

  • During the baseline condition, students were taken to a grocery store to evaluate their purchasing skills prior to being introduced to Project Shop.

  • Grocery store probes continued once a week during the intervention phase.

  • During the intervention phase, students viewed the 3 video models each week and used the CD-ROM instructional program 4-5 times each week for 30 minutes.

  • After completing the intervention phase, students were taken to 3 new grocery stores to complete the same grocery store tasks.

  • Students returned to the initial grocery store after 30 days to determine their maintenance of purchasing skills.
  • Participants’ parents also rated students’ grocery purchasing skills prior to and after completing the study.

Results

  • Participants demonstrated 60%-100% accuracy on the computer-based assessment by the end of the intervention.
  • During the baseline grocery store-based probe, students were able to perform few, if any, of the step in purchasing items; however, they were able to perform with 100% accuracy by the end of the computer based instruction phase.
  • During the generalization probes conducted at 3 different grocery stores, one participant purchased items with 80% accuracy while the other two participants purchased items with 100% accuracy.
  • Students were able to maintain the acquired skills with 100% accuracy after 30 days.
  • In addition, parents rated their children’s purchasing skills higher during the posttest administration of the questionnaire.
  • The findings indicate that computer based instruction may be used to increase the purchasing skills of secondary students with intellectual disabilities.
Categories:
  • Life Skills
Tags: