Self-Management

Self-management articles use AT to support students with disabilities in independent task completion and independent living skills.

Computer-based instruction for purchasing skills

Sep 16, 2013, 12:41 PM
Ayres, K. M., Langone, J., Boon, R. T., & Norman, A. (2006). Computer-based instruction for purchasing skills. Education and Training in Developmental Disabilities, 41(3), 253-263.

Characteristics

  • Four 14-year-old middle school students with intellectual disabilities participated in the study.
  • All four participants had IEP goals relating to increasing their purchasing skills.
  • This study examined the effectiveness of using computers and video to reinforce classroom-based instruction on purchasing skills (i.e., paying for goods in uneven dollar amounts).

  • The computer program taught students how to pay for goods and used video modeling in order to facilitate generalization to other settings, such as a grocery store.

Setting

  • This study took place within a local grocery store and self-contained classroom located in the Southeastern U.S.

Method

  • Prior to the intervention phase, students had already demonstrated that they were capable of paying for items priced at a whole dollar amount; however, they were unable to transfer their knowledge of purchasing items to paying for uneven dollar amounts.
  • During the baseline phase, students participated in a simulation in the classroom in which they practiced buying items from the teacher.

  • Students’ purchasing skills were assessed during baseline and intervention phases via a computer-based probe.

  • Once students achieved stable baseline scores, they were able to proceed to the intervention phase.

  • The classroom-based simulations continued during the intervention phase, and computer-based instruction was also added.

  • Each computer-based instruction session consisted of 10 trials in which the computerized cashier asked them to pay a random total and students had to pay the dollar amount using a video at the bottom of the screen.

  • If the student paid the wrong amount in the computer program, the program told them whether they paid too much or too little, demonstrated the correct payment, and gave the student a second try at making the payment.

  • After achieving 80% accuracy during the intervention phase, students completed a community-based probe (staged within a local grocery store) where a purchasing scenario was simulated.

  • The community-based probes continued after the intervention phase to monitor students’ maintenance of the effects.

  • In addition, students were taken to a local shopping mall to make purchases in order to determine whether the skills acquired generalized to other environments.

Results

  •  The intervention was successful in teaching the purchasing strategy to 3 out of 4 participants.
  • The findings suggest that computer-based video instruction and modeling may be used in conjunction with other simulations to teach functional skills to students with intellectual disabilities.
Categories:
  • Life Skills
Tags:

Transition Planning

Computer Assisted Instruction

Computer-based instruction for purchasing skills

Sep 16, 2013, 12:41 PM
Ayres, K. M., Langone, J., Boon, R. T., & Norman, A. (2006). Computer-based instruction for purchasing skills. Education and Training in Developmental Disabilities, 41(3), 253-263.

Characteristics

  • Four 14-year-old middle school students with intellectual disabilities participated in the study.
  • All four participants had IEP goals relating to increasing their purchasing skills.
  • This study examined the effectiveness of using computers and video to reinforce classroom-based instruction on purchasing skills (i.e., paying for goods in uneven dollar amounts).

  • The computer program taught students how to pay for goods and used video modeling in order to facilitate generalization to other settings, such as a grocery store.

Setting

  • This study took place within a local grocery store and self-contained classroom located in the Southeastern U.S.

Method

  • Prior to the intervention phase, students had already demonstrated that they were capable of paying for items priced at a whole dollar amount; however, they were unable to transfer their knowledge of purchasing items to paying for uneven dollar amounts.
  • During the baseline phase, students participated in a simulation in the classroom in which they practiced buying items from the teacher.

  • Students’ purchasing skills were assessed during baseline and intervention phases via a computer-based probe.

  • Once students achieved stable baseline scores, they were able to proceed to the intervention phase.

  • The classroom-based simulations continued during the intervention phase, and computer-based instruction was also added.

  • Each computer-based instruction session consisted of 10 trials in which the computerized cashier asked them to pay a random total and students had to pay the dollar amount using a video at the bottom of the screen.

  • If the student paid the wrong amount in the computer program, the program told them whether they paid too much or too little, demonstrated the correct payment, and gave the student a second try at making the payment.

  • After achieving 80% accuracy during the intervention phase, students completed a community-based probe (staged within a local grocery store) where a purchasing scenario was simulated.

  • The community-based probes continued after the intervention phase to monitor students’ maintenance of the effects.

  • In addition, students were taken to a local shopping mall to make purchases in order to determine whether the skills acquired generalized to other environments.

Results

  •  The intervention was successful in teaching the purchasing strategy to 3 out of 4 participants.
  • The findings suggest that computer-based video instruction and modeling may be used in conjunction with other simulations to teach functional skills to students with intellectual disabilities.
Categories:
  • Life Skills
Tags:

Life Skills

Computer Assisted Instruction

Computer-based instruction for purchasing skills

Sep 16, 2013, 12:41 PM
Ayres, K. M., Langone, J., Boon, R. T., & Norman, A. (2006). Computer-based instruction for purchasing skills. Education and Training in Developmental Disabilities, 41(3), 253-263.

Characteristics

  • Four 14-year-old middle school students with intellectual disabilities participated in the study.
  • All four participants had IEP goals relating to increasing their purchasing skills.
  • This study examined the effectiveness of using computers and video to reinforce classroom-based instruction on purchasing skills (i.e., paying for goods in uneven dollar amounts).

  • The computer program taught students how to pay for goods and used video modeling in order to facilitate generalization to other settings, such as a grocery store.

Setting

  • This study took place within a local grocery store and self-contained classroom located in the Southeastern U.S.

Method

  • Prior to the intervention phase, students had already demonstrated that they were capable of paying for items priced at a whole dollar amount; however, they were unable to transfer their knowledge of purchasing items to paying for uneven dollar amounts.
  • During the baseline phase, students participated in a simulation in the classroom in which they practiced buying items from the teacher.

  • Students’ purchasing skills were assessed during baseline and intervention phases via a computer-based probe.

  • Once students achieved stable baseline scores, they were able to proceed to the intervention phase.

  • The classroom-based simulations continued during the intervention phase, and computer-based instruction was also added.

  • Each computer-based instruction session consisted of 10 trials in which the computerized cashier asked them to pay a random total and students had to pay the dollar amount using a video at the bottom of the screen.

  • If the student paid the wrong amount in the computer program, the program told them whether they paid too much or too little, demonstrated the correct payment, and gave the student a second try at making the payment.

  • After achieving 80% accuracy during the intervention phase, students completed a community-based probe (staged within a local grocery store) where a purchasing scenario was simulated.

  • The community-based probes continued after the intervention phase to monitor students’ maintenance of the effects.

  • In addition, students were taken to a local shopping mall to make purchases in order to determine whether the skills acquired generalized to other environments.

Results

  •  The intervention was successful in teaching the purchasing strategy to 3 out of 4 participants.
  • The findings suggest that computer-based video instruction and modeling may be used in conjunction with other simulations to teach functional skills to students with intellectual disabilities.
Categories:
  • Life Skills
Tags: