Reading Aides

This category of articles includes studies and reviews pertaining to the use of reading aids, such as text-to-speech software and e-books, both in and outside of the classroom.

An Analysis of Reading and Spelling Abilities of Children Using AAC: Understanding a Continuum of Competence

Jan 15, 2013, 17:03 PM

Dahlgren Sandberg, A., Smith, M. & Larsson, M. (2010). An Analysis of Reading and Spelling Abilities of Children Using AAC: Understanding a Continuum of Competence. Augmentative and Alternative Communication, 26(3), 191-202.

Characteristics

  • Grade/Age level: Age 5-13 years old
  • Specific Difficulty Addressed: Decoding and linguistic comprehension in AAC users
  • Type of AT Used: Augmentative and Alternative Communication (AAC)

Setting

Method

  • Participants included 14 children with motor and anarthria/severe congenital dysarthria, average cognitive abilities, hearing and corrected vision within normal limits, and aged 5-13 years.
  • Measures: British Picture Vocabulary Scales (BPVS); Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test; Raven’s Progressive Matrices.
  • Phonological Awareness Tasks: Rhyme (visual/auditory), Phoneme blending, segmentation, identification, deletion, and word length.
  • Memory Tasks: Modified Digit Span Forward/Backwards and Corsi Blocks
  • Letter knowledge was assessed before reading and spelling.
  • Reading Tasks: lexical decision; pseudoword reading; proofreading; word decoding; adapted Word Chains Test; sentence reading
  • Spelling Tasks: dictated; pseudoword spelling; visual spelling
  • Throughout assessment, participants used their usual communication mode.
  • Factor analysis (PCA) was used to determine if variables across measures were related.

Results

  • There was great variation in age, school experience, phonological awareness, reading and spelling skills.
  • Participants were grouped into Nonreaders, Decoders, and Good Readers.
  • Good readers differed from decoders by age, phonological awareness level (non sig. when controlled for age and school experience), and spelling skill level.
  • Good readers differed from nonreaders by age, school experience, phonological awareness level (non sig when control for age/school experience), spelling skill level, and digit span performance.
  • Decoders differed from nonreaders by amount of school experience and digit span performance.
  • Discussion: Readers were older and had better spelling skills than decoders and nonreaders. Nonreaders performed worse on the short term memory task than decoders and readers. It is unlikely that any one factor predicts reading progression in this population. It appears that working memory is essential in early literacy development and later spelling and decoding become essential.
Categories:
  • Reading
  • Computer Assisted Instruction
Tags:
  • Individual profiles
  • Cerebral palsy
  • Children
  • Phonological awareness
  • Spelling
  • Reading

Computer Assisted Instruction

An Analysis of Reading and Spelling Abilities of Children Using AAC: Understanding a Continuum of Competence

Jan 15, 2013, 17:03 PM

Dahlgren Sandberg, A., Smith, M. & Larsson, M. (2010). An Analysis of Reading and Spelling Abilities of Children Using AAC: Understanding a Continuum of Competence. Augmentative and Alternative Communication, 26(3), 191-202.

Characteristics

  • Grade/Age level: Age 5-13 years old
  • Specific Difficulty Addressed: Decoding and linguistic comprehension in AAC users
  • Type of AT Used: Augmentative and Alternative Communication (AAC)

Setting

Method

  • Participants included 14 children with motor and anarthria/severe congenital dysarthria, average cognitive abilities, hearing and corrected vision within normal limits, and aged 5-13 years.
  • Measures: British Picture Vocabulary Scales (BPVS); Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test; Raven’s Progressive Matrices.
  • Phonological Awareness Tasks: Rhyme (visual/auditory), Phoneme blending, segmentation, identification, deletion, and word length.
  • Memory Tasks: Modified Digit Span Forward/Backwards and Corsi Blocks
  • Letter knowledge was assessed before reading and spelling.
  • Reading Tasks: lexical decision; pseudoword reading; proofreading; word decoding; adapted Word Chains Test; sentence reading
  • Spelling Tasks: dictated; pseudoword spelling; visual spelling
  • Throughout assessment, participants used their usual communication mode.
  • Factor analysis (PCA) was used to determine if variables across measures were related.

Results

  • There was great variation in age, school experience, phonological awareness, reading and spelling skills.
  • Participants were grouped into Nonreaders, Decoders, and Good Readers.
  • Good readers differed from decoders by age, phonological awareness level (non sig. when controlled for age and school experience), and spelling skill level.
  • Good readers differed from nonreaders by age, school experience, phonological awareness level (non sig when control for age/school experience), spelling skill level, and digit span performance.
  • Decoders differed from nonreaders by amount of school experience and digit span performance.
  • Discussion: Readers were older and had better spelling skills than decoders and nonreaders. Nonreaders performed worse on the short term memory task than decoders and readers. It is unlikely that any one factor predicts reading progression in this population. It appears that working memory is essential in early literacy development and later spelling and decoding become essential.
Categories:
  • Reading
  • Computer Assisted Instruction
Tags:
  • Individual profiles
  • Cerebral palsy
  • Children
  • Phonological awareness
  • Spelling
  • Reading