Reading Aides

This category of articles includes studies and reviews pertaining to the use of reading aids, such as text-to-speech software and e-books, both in and outside of the classroom.

Accommodating Remedial Readers in the General Education Setting: Is Listening-While-Reading Sufficient to Improve Factual and Inferential Comprehension?

Jan 15, 2013, 17:12 PM
Schmitt, A.J., Hale, A.D., McCallum, E. & Mauck, B. (2011). Accommodating Remedial Readers in the General Education Setting: Is Listening-While-Reading Sufficient to Improve Factual and Inferential Comprehension? Psychology in the Schools, 48(1), 37-45.

Characteristics

  • Grade/Age Level: Middle school students
  • Specific Difficulty Addressed: Reading comprehension and content learning  
  • Type of AT Used: Text-to-speech (Kurzweil 3000 Version 10)

Setting

Method

  • 25 middle school students needing remedial support for reading participated in this study. Students had Scholastic Reading Inventory levels from 1st to 5th grade, with all participants at least 2 grade levels below expectation.
  • Students read grade level passages from Timed Reading Series Plus (Spargo, 1998), with 5 factual and 5 inferential multiple choice comprehension questions.
  • Participants completed 3 passages in either the listening while reading (LWR) or silent reading (SR) condition on the first day and 3 passages in the other condition on the following day; condition order was counterbalanced across participants.
  • Comprehension questions were completed on paper with pencils directly after reading.

Results

  • Across the 10 comprehension questions, there was no difference between the LWR and the SR conditions.
  • The factual and inferential comprehension questions were then analyzed separately.
  • There was no difference between the factual and inferential comprehension in either the SR or the LWR conditions.
  • Discussion:
    • One key difference between this study and others that have shown significant difference in SR and LWR is that previous studies used below-grade level reading passages.
    • Phonemic awareness, alphabetic skills, and decoding are important skills for comprehension, but not sufficient.
    • School psychologists should be assessing general ability, vocabulary, metacognitive strategies, and reading comprehension to identify the nature of the problem and target evidence-based interventions.
Categories:
  • Reading Aides
Tags:
  • Text-to-speech
  • Listening comprehension
  • Middle school students
  • Reading comprehension
  • Remedial education
  • Silent reading

Computer Assisted Instruction

Accommodating Remedial Readers in the General Education Setting: Is Listening-While-Reading Sufficient to Improve Factual and Inferential Comprehension?

Jan 15, 2013, 17:12 PM
Schmitt, A.J., Hale, A.D., McCallum, E. & Mauck, B. (2011). Accommodating Remedial Readers in the General Education Setting: Is Listening-While-Reading Sufficient to Improve Factual and Inferential Comprehension? Psychology in the Schools, 48(1), 37-45.

Characteristics

  • Grade/Age Level: Middle school students
  • Specific Difficulty Addressed: Reading comprehension and content learning  
  • Type of AT Used: Text-to-speech (Kurzweil 3000 Version 10)

Setting

Method

  • 25 middle school students needing remedial support for reading participated in this study. Students had Scholastic Reading Inventory levels from 1st to 5th grade, with all participants at least 2 grade levels below expectation.
  • Students read grade level passages from Timed Reading Series Plus (Spargo, 1998), with 5 factual and 5 inferential multiple choice comprehension questions.
  • Participants completed 3 passages in either the listening while reading (LWR) or silent reading (SR) condition on the first day and 3 passages in the other condition on the following day; condition order was counterbalanced across participants.
  • Comprehension questions were completed on paper with pencils directly after reading.

Results

  • Across the 10 comprehension questions, there was no difference between the LWR and the SR conditions.
  • The factual and inferential comprehension questions were then analyzed separately.
  • There was no difference between the factual and inferential comprehension in either the SR or the LWR conditions.
  • Discussion:
    • One key difference between this study and others that have shown significant difference in SR and LWR is that previous studies used below-grade level reading passages.
    • Phonemic awareness, alphabetic skills, and decoding are important skills for comprehension, but not sufficient.
    • School psychologists should be assessing general ability, vocabulary, metacognitive strategies, and reading comprehension to identify the nature of the problem and target evidence-based interventions.
Categories:
  • Reading Aides
Tags:
  • Text-to-speech
  • Listening comprehension
  • Middle school students
  • Reading comprehension
  • Remedial education
  • Silent reading