Reading Aides

This category of articles includes studies and reviews pertaining to the use of reading aids, such as text-to-speech software and e-books, both in and outside of the classroom.

Computer-assisted instruction for teaching academic skills to students with autism spectrum disorders: A review of literature

Jun 28, 2013, 12:20 PM
Pennington, R.C. (2010). Computer-Assisted Instruction for Teaching Academic Skills to Students with Autism Spectrum Disorders: A Review of Literature. Focus on Autism and Other Developmental Disabilities, 25(4), 239-248.

Characteristics

  • Grade/Age level: Ages 3-17
  • Specific Difficulty Addressed: Academic skills with students with autism spectrum disorders (ASD)
  • Type of AT Used: Computer-aided instruction (CAI) 

Setting

  • Review of literature

Method

  • A review was conducted using ERIC, PsychINFO, and Psychology and Behavioral Sciences Collection databases from 1998-2008. Additionally, searches were conducted of 13 relevant journals from 1997-2007.
  • Inclusion criteria: published in a peer-reviewed journal, used experimental or quasi-experimental design, independent variable incorporated CAI, study focused on acquisition of an academic skill, and at least one participant had a diagnosis of ASD.

Results

  • 15 articles met the inclusion criteria and were reviewed for this study.
  • Participants across studies included 12 females and 40 males (N=52) aged 3-17 years old.
  • All studies involved acquisition of literacy skills (e.g., vocabulary, decoding, spelling, sentence construction).
  • Two studies used a Light-WRITER-SL35, one used a Delta Messages program, and two used PowerPoint. Nine used software specifically developed for the investigation and 5 used commercially available programs.
  • Five studies used a mouse, 4 studies used a touch screen, and 1 used an eye gaze selection method.
  • Teacher involvement was highly varied across studies.
  • In 5 studies, pretest and posttest data were the only dependent measures, while 2 other studies combined that data with single-subject design. Ten studies used single subject designs (e.g., multiple baseline, multiple probe, or alternating treatments).
  • All studies found participants gained the target academic skill to some degree. CAI interventions were more efficient than teacher-only instruction and resulted in more appropriate behavior during teaching.
  • Nine studies reported positive generalization effects and ten studies reported positive maintenance effects.
  • Only 5 studies addressed social validity.
  • Only 4 studies used multiple probe or baseline type designs, which allowed for functional relationships to be operationalized between intervention and targeted response.
  • Although there is limited research in this area, there is promise that CAI may prove to be an effective intervention for students with autism in the future although much more research is needed before any definitive conclusions can be drawn.
Categories:
  • Reading
Tags:

Computer Assisted Instruction

Computer-assisted instruction for teaching academic skills to students with autism spectrum disorders: A review of literature

Jun 28, 2013, 12:20 PM
Pennington, R.C. (2010). Computer-Assisted Instruction for Teaching Academic Skills to Students with Autism Spectrum Disorders: A Review of Literature. Focus on Autism and Other Developmental Disabilities, 25(4), 239-248.

Characteristics

  • Grade/Age level: Ages 3-17
  • Specific Difficulty Addressed: Academic skills with students with autism spectrum disorders (ASD)
  • Type of AT Used: Computer-aided instruction (CAI) 

Setting

  • Review of literature

Method

  • A review was conducted using ERIC, PsychINFO, and Psychology and Behavioral Sciences Collection databases from 1998-2008. Additionally, searches were conducted of 13 relevant journals from 1997-2007.
  • Inclusion criteria: published in a peer-reviewed journal, used experimental or quasi-experimental design, independent variable incorporated CAI, study focused on acquisition of an academic skill, and at least one participant had a diagnosis of ASD.

Results

  • 15 articles met the inclusion criteria and were reviewed for this study.
  • Participants across studies included 12 females and 40 males (N=52) aged 3-17 years old.
  • All studies involved acquisition of literacy skills (e.g., vocabulary, decoding, spelling, sentence construction).
  • Two studies used a Light-WRITER-SL35, one used a Delta Messages program, and two used PowerPoint. Nine used software specifically developed for the investigation and 5 used commercially available programs.
  • Five studies used a mouse, 4 studies used a touch screen, and 1 used an eye gaze selection method.
  • Teacher involvement was highly varied across studies.
  • In 5 studies, pretest and posttest data were the only dependent measures, while 2 other studies combined that data with single-subject design. Ten studies used single subject designs (e.g., multiple baseline, multiple probe, or alternating treatments).
  • All studies found participants gained the target academic skill to some degree. CAI interventions were more efficient than teacher-only instruction and resulted in more appropriate behavior during teaching.
  • Nine studies reported positive generalization effects and ten studies reported positive maintenance effects.
  • Only 5 studies addressed social validity.
  • Only 4 studies used multiple probe or baseline type designs, which allowed for functional relationships to be operationalized between intervention and targeted response.
  • Although there is limited research in this area, there is promise that CAI may prove to be an effective intervention for students with autism in the future although much more research is needed before any definitive conclusions can be drawn.
Categories:
  • Reading
Tags: