Reading Aides

This category of articles includes studies and reviews pertaining to the use of reading aids, such as text-to-speech software and e-books, both in and outside of the classroom.

Comparison of the effects of smart board technology and flash card instruction on sight word recognition and observational learning

Jun 28, 2013, 12:17 PM
Mechling, L. C., Gast, D. L., Thompson, K. L. (2008). Comparison of the effects of smart board technology and flash card instruction on sight word recognition and observational learning. Journal of Special Education Technology, 23(1), 34-46.

Characteristics

  • Two female students and one male student (ages 19 to 21) with moderate intellectual disabilities participated in the study.
  • All 3 students had participated in a previous study looking at the effectiveness of SMART Board technology to teach sight words and had IEP goals relating to increasing their functional sight word vocabulary.
  • This study compared the effectiveness of using a SMART Board with interactive whiteboard technology and flash cards for teaching functional sight words to students with moderate intellectual disabilities.
  • The SMART Board, which uses a touch-sensitive screen and connects to a computer and digital projector, allowed students to view sight words on a large widescreen.

Setting

  • The study took place on a university campus where the students were participating in a high school transition program.

Method

  • Each participant was screened to determine their baseline knowledge of grocery-store item words.
  • Students were assigned a total of 6 unknown words (3 flash card words, and 3 SMART Board words).
  • Students participated in flash card group instruction and SMART Board group instruction 2-3 days a week, with each session consisting of 36 trials of flash card or SMART Board words so that each students’ words were presented 4 times per session.
  • Each student received direct instruction when learning their 6 target words and observed the other students when they received direct instruction on their own words.
  • Probe sessions were also conducted to determine the students’ knowledge of their target words as well as their observational learning of other students’ site words at different phases of the study.

Results

  • Results revealed that the SMART Board and flash cards were equally effective in helping students learn their target sight words; however, students were more likely to learn other participants’ words when they were presented via SMART Board technology (89.6% of non-target words) than when they were presented via flash cards (50% of non-target words). 
  • Although this study does not find evidence that the SMART Board was more effective in helping students learn their own target words, using the SMART Board did lead to increased amounts of observational learning.
Categories:
  • Reading
Tags:

Computer Assisted Instruction

Comparison of the effects of smart board technology and flash card instruction on sight word recognition and observational learning

Jun 28, 2013, 12:17 PM
Mechling, L. C., Gast, D. L., Thompson, K. L. (2008). Comparison of the effects of smart board technology and flash card instruction on sight word recognition and observational learning. Journal of Special Education Technology, 23(1), 34-46.

Characteristics

  • Two female students and one male student (ages 19 to 21) with moderate intellectual disabilities participated in the study.
  • All 3 students had participated in a previous study looking at the effectiveness of SMART Board technology to teach sight words and had IEP goals relating to increasing their functional sight word vocabulary.
  • This study compared the effectiveness of using a SMART Board with interactive whiteboard technology and flash cards for teaching functional sight words to students with moderate intellectual disabilities.
  • The SMART Board, which uses a touch-sensitive screen and connects to a computer and digital projector, allowed students to view sight words on a large widescreen.

Setting

  • The study took place on a university campus where the students were participating in a high school transition program.

Method

  • Each participant was screened to determine their baseline knowledge of grocery-store item words.
  • Students were assigned a total of 6 unknown words (3 flash card words, and 3 SMART Board words).
  • Students participated in flash card group instruction and SMART Board group instruction 2-3 days a week, with each session consisting of 36 trials of flash card or SMART Board words so that each students’ words were presented 4 times per session.
  • Each student received direct instruction when learning their 6 target words and observed the other students when they received direct instruction on their own words.
  • Probe sessions were also conducted to determine the students’ knowledge of their target words as well as their observational learning of other students’ site words at different phases of the study.

Results

  • Results revealed that the SMART Board and flash cards were equally effective in helping students learn their target sight words; however, students were more likely to learn other participants’ words when they were presented via SMART Board technology (89.6% of non-target words) than when they were presented via flash cards (50% of non-target words). 
  • Although this study does not find evidence that the SMART Board was more effective in helping students learn their own target words, using the SMART Board did lead to increased amounts of observational learning.
Categories:
  • Reading
Tags: