Reading Aides

This category of articles includes studies and reviews pertaining to the use of reading aids, such as text-to-speech software and e-books, both in and outside of the classroom.

Effects of peer tutoring with audio prompting on vocabulary acquisition for struggling readers

Jun 28, 2013, 12:55 PM
Mackiewicz, S. M., Wood, C. L., Cooke, N. L., & Mazzotti, V. L. (2010). Effects of peer tutoring with audio prompting on vocabulary acquisition for struggling readers. Remedial and Special Education, 1-10.

Characteristics

  • This study explored the effectiveness of using a reciprocal peer tutoring strategy to improve reading vocabulary.
  • Given that students need to have specific skills in order to be successful tutors, this study used digital recordings to provide audio prompts to novice peer tutors.
  • In this reciprocal peer tutoring intervention, both students within a pair took on the tutor and tutee role and were provided with a verbal model of correct prompts to use when serving as the tutor.
  • Students used VoicePods, a portable digital recording and playback device with reusable card sleeves which allow for 10 second prompts to be recorded.
  • Eight elementary students (aged 9-11) identified as either having a learning disability in reading or as being at-risk for reading difficulties participated in the study.

Setting

  • This study took place within an urban, elementary school located in the southeastern U.S.

Method

  • Participants completed a fill in the blank vocabulary pretest, which was used to determine the target vocabulary words that would be used during the intervention.
  • Throughout the intervention, pretests were administered prior to each new reading lesson, and posttests were given after lessons on each story ended.
  • Students participated in several 40-minute incidental learning sessions taken from Open Court Reading that were teacher-led and involved students reading target vocabulary words aloud and reading independently.
  • In addition, students participated in 4 student tutoring sessions each week that mirrored the steps followed during the incidental learning conditions.
  • All students received a 1-hour training session before beginning reciprocal tutoring and were observed and provided with corrective feedback during their first four tutoring sessions.
  • During each tutoring session, the student tutor used 8 cards for each vocabulary word that covered (1) the vocab word, (2) the definition or a synonym, (3) a sentence using the word, (4) an identical sentence using the definition or synonym, (5) two fill in the blank sentences, and (6) the correct sentence from the previous card.

Results

  • The mean performance on tests for participants was higher during peer tutoring with audio prompting conditions when compared to incidental learning conditions.
  • The findings demonstrate that supplemental vocabulary instruction can be efficient and may not even require teacher monitoring if sufficient training and prompts are provided to students as they tutor one another.
  • In particular, the findings suggest that digitally recorded prompts can be a useful tool for students serving as tutors to peers.
Categories:
  • Reading
Tags:

Computer Assisted Instruction

Effects of peer tutoring with audio prompting on vocabulary acquisition for struggling readers

Jun 28, 2013, 12:55 PM
Mackiewicz, S. M., Wood, C. L., Cooke, N. L., & Mazzotti, V. L. (2010). Effects of peer tutoring with audio prompting on vocabulary acquisition for struggling readers. Remedial and Special Education, 1-10.

Characteristics

  • This study explored the effectiveness of using a reciprocal peer tutoring strategy to improve reading vocabulary.
  • Given that students need to have specific skills in order to be successful tutors, this study used digital recordings to provide audio prompts to novice peer tutors.
  • In this reciprocal peer tutoring intervention, both students within a pair took on the tutor and tutee role and were provided with a verbal model of correct prompts to use when serving as the tutor.
  • Students used VoicePods, a portable digital recording and playback device with reusable card sleeves which allow for 10 second prompts to be recorded.
  • Eight elementary students (aged 9-11) identified as either having a learning disability in reading or as being at-risk for reading difficulties participated in the study.

Setting

  • This study took place within an urban, elementary school located in the southeastern U.S.

Method

  • Participants completed a fill in the blank vocabulary pretest, which was used to determine the target vocabulary words that would be used during the intervention.
  • Throughout the intervention, pretests were administered prior to each new reading lesson, and posttests were given after lessons on each story ended.
  • Students participated in several 40-minute incidental learning sessions taken from Open Court Reading that were teacher-led and involved students reading target vocabulary words aloud and reading independently.
  • In addition, students participated in 4 student tutoring sessions each week that mirrored the steps followed during the incidental learning conditions.
  • All students received a 1-hour training session before beginning reciprocal tutoring and were observed and provided with corrective feedback during their first four tutoring sessions.
  • During each tutoring session, the student tutor used 8 cards for each vocabulary word that covered (1) the vocab word, (2) the definition or a synonym, (3) a sentence using the word, (4) an identical sentence using the definition or synonym, (5) two fill in the blank sentences, and (6) the correct sentence from the previous card.

Results

  • The mean performance on tests for participants was higher during peer tutoring with audio prompting conditions when compared to incidental learning conditions.
  • The findings demonstrate that supplemental vocabulary instruction can be efficient and may not even require teacher monitoring if sufficient training and prompts are provided to students as they tutor one another.
  • In particular, the findings suggest that digitally recorded prompts can be a useful tool for students serving as tutors to peers.
Categories:
  • Reading
Tags: