Reading Aides

This category of articles includes studies and reviews pertaining to the use of reading aids, such as text-to-speech software and e-books, both in and outside of the classroom.

Computer-based reading instruction for young children with disabilities

Jun 28, 2013, 12:23 PM

Lee, Y., & Vail, C. O. (2005). Computer-based reading instruction for young children with disabilities. Journal of Special Education Technology, 20(1), 5-18.

Characteristics

  • Four males aged 6-7 with developmental disabilities who had IEP goals in the area of reading participated.
  • Given that each participant had IEP goals in reading, the study sought to evaluate whether young students with disabilities could learn sight words using a computer program and generalize the target behavior to other settings.
  • A program called Word Wizard was used as the computer-based instructional tool in the study.
  • Word Wizard allowed users to learn basic sight words by presenting a target word, including it in a sentence, presenting a video clip relevant to the word, and then prompting the user to choose the target word from four choices.

Setting

  • The study took place in a one-on-one setting within a special education classroom at the participants’ school.

Method

  • Participants learned four word sets using the computer program (the number of total sessions ranged from 37-67).
  • Prior to beginning each word set, baseline data was collected on participant’s pre-intervention knowledge of the sight words to be introduced within the set.
  • After each intervention session, a computerized probe with all the sight words within the current word set was administered.
  • Participants moved on to the next word set after scoring 100% on the prior word set probe.
  • Generalization to other materials such as storybooks was also assessed through pre and post-tests.

Results

  • Data graphed throughout the intervention demonstrated that all 4 participants were able to learn new sight words via the computerized intervention program.
  • All participants were also able to generalize their knowledge of new sight words to other materials.
  • Researchers noted that student behavior problems during computer-based instruction occurred in some instances; however, the student with autistic-like behaviors was attentive throughout the intervention, which suggests the possible utility of using computer programs with students with autism spectrum disorders.
Categories:
  • Reading
Tags:

Computer Assisted Instruction

Computer-based reading instruction for young children with disabilities

Jun 28, 2013, 12:23 PM

Lee, Y., & Vail, C. O. (2005). Computer-based reading instruction for young children with disabilities. Journal of Special Education Technology, 20(1), 5-18.

Characteristics

  • Four males aged 6-7 with developmental disabilities who had IEP goals in the area of reading participated.
  • Given that each participant had IEP goals in reading, the study sought to evaluate whether young students with disabilities could learn sight words using a computer program and generalize the target behavior to other settings.
  • A program called Word Wizard was used as the computer-based instructional tool in the study.
  • Word Wizard allowed users to learn basic sight words by presenting a target word, including it in a sentence, presenting a video clip relevant to the word, and then prompting the user to choose the target word from four choices.

Setting

  • The study took place in a one-on-one setting within a special education classroom at the participants’ school.

Method

  • Participants learned four word sets using the computer program (the number of total sessions ranged from 37-67).
  • Prior to beginning each word set, baseline data was collected on participant’s pre-intervention knowledge of the sight words to be introduced within the set.
  • After each intervention session, a computerized probe with all the sight words within the current word set was administered.
  • Participants moved on to the next word set after scoring 100% on the prior word set probe.
  • Generalization to other materials such as storybooks was also assessed through pre and post-tests.

Results

  • Data graphed throughout the intervention demonstrated that all 4 participants were able to learn new sight words via the computerized intervention program.
  • All participants were also able to generalize their knowledge of new sight words to other materials.
  • Researchers noted that student behavior problems during computer-based instruction occurred in some instances; however, the student with autistic-like behaviors was attentive throughout the intervention, which suggests the possible utility of using computer programs with students with autism spectrum disorders.
Categories:
  • Reading
Tags: