Reading Aides

This category of articles includes studies and reviews pertaining to the use of reading aids, such as text-to-speech software and e-books, both in and outside of the classroom.

Assistive software tools for secondary level students with literacy difficulties

Jun 28, 2013, 12:04 PM
Lange, A. A., McPhillips, M., Mulhern, G., & Wylie, J. (2006). Assistive software tools for secondary level students with literacy difficulties. Journal of Special Education Technology, 21(3), 13-22.

Characteristics

  • Eighty-three students aged 14-15 with reading difficulties in Belfast, Northern Ireland participated in the study.
  • All participants were reading at a level at least 1 year behind their chronological age.
  • The study examined the effect that four assistive software tools available within the Read & Write Gold assistive software program had on students’ reading performance.
  • The assistive software tools utilized by the students were a speech synthesis tool, a spellchecker, a homophone detector, and an electronic dictionary.

Setting

  • The study took place in the computer labs of the participants’ schools.

Method

  • Participants were divided into 3 groups: the Assistive Software group, the Microsoft Word Control group, and the Full Control group.
  • Participants in the Assistive Software group took a computer-based pretest examining their reading comprehension, proofreading, and “meaning finding” skills; were subsequently trained to use the Read & Write Gold assistive software package for 6, 45-minute sessions; and were required to use the software they were trained on during the posttest.
  • Similar to the Assistive Software group, the Microsoft Word Control participants took the initial posttests, received training on how to use the tools available within Word during 6, 45-minute sessions, and were required to use the Word tools during the posttest.
  • The Full Control group completed the pretest and posttest without receiving any training and without the use of any assistive technology during the posttest.

Results

  • The results revealed that students in the Assistive Software group showed improvement on reading comprehension, homophone error detection, spelling error detection, and word meaning.
  • Participants in the Microsoft Word Control group also showed improvements on spelling error detection and word meaning.
  • Students in the Full Control group showed no significant gains in any of the areas assessed.
  • The findings indicate that the assistive tools available to students did significantly improve their performance in several areas relating to reading.
Categories:
  • Reading
Tags:

Computer Assisted Instruction

Assistive software tools for secondary level students with literacy difficulties

Jun 28, 2013, 12:04 PM
Lange, A. A., McPhillips, M., Mulhern, G., & Wylie, J. (2006). Assistive software tools for secondary level students with literacy difficulties. Journal of Special Education Technology, 21(3), 13-22.

Characteristics

  • Eighty-three students aged 14-15 with reading difficulties in Belfast, Northern Ireland participated in the study.
  • All participants were reading at a level at least 1 year behind their chronological age.
  • The study examined the effect that four assistive software tools available within the Read & Write Gold assistive software program had on students’ reading performance.
  • The assistive software tools utilized by the students were a speech synthesis tool, a spellchecker, a homophone detector, and an electronic dictionary.

Setting

  • The study took place in the computer labs of the participants’ schools.

Method

  • Participants were divided into 3 groups: the Assistive Software group, the Microsoft Word Control group, and the Full Control group.
  • Participants in the Assistive Software group took a computer-based pretest examining their reading comprehension, proofreading, and “meaning finding” skills; were subsequently trained to use the Read & Write Gold assistive software package for 6, 45-minute sessions; and were required to use the software they were trained on during the posttest.
  • Similar to the Assistive Software group, the Microsoft Word Control participants took the initial posttests, received training on how to use the tools available within Word during 6, 45-minute sessions, and were required to use the Word tools during the posttest.
  • The Full Control group completed the pretest and posttest without receiving any training and without the use of any assistive technology during the posttest.

Results

  • The results revealed that students in the Assistive Software group showed improvement on reading comprehension, homophone error detection, spelling error detection, and word meaning.
  • Participants in the Microsoft Word Control group also showed improvements on spelling error detection and word meaning.
  • Students in the Full Control group showed no significant gains in any of the areas assessed.
  • The findings indicate that the assistive tools available to students did significantly improve their performance in several areas relating to reading.
Categories:
  • Reading
Tags: