Reading Aides

This category of articles includes studies and reviews pertaining to the use of reading aids, such as text-to-speech software and e-books, both in and outside of the classroom.

Improving the reading comprehension of middle school students with disabilities through computer-assisted collaborative strategic reading

Jun 28, 2013, 13:07 PM
Kim, A-H., Vaughn, S., Klinger, J. K., Woodruff, A. L., Reutebuch, C. K., & Kouzekanani, K. (2006).  Improving the reading comprehension of middle school students with disabilities through computer-assisted collaborative strategic reading. Remedial and Special Education, 27(4), 235-249.

Characteristics

  • This study examined the effectiveness of using computer-assisted collaborative strategic reading to improve the reading comprehension of middle school students with learning disabilities.
  • Computer-assisted collaborative strategic reading (CACSR) allows students to use an interactive online learning environment to help them use a variety of comprehension strategies while reading texts.
  • CACSR monitors student performance using the computer program and provides corrective feedback.
  • Non computer-assisted collaborative strategic reading is conducted by the classroom teacher, and later, independently by groups of students as they learn how to use several different pre-reading, during reading, and post-reading techniques to assist them in understanding readings.
  • This study examined pairs of students as they worked together using a computer assisted version of collaborative strategic reading.
  • Two classrooms with middle school students with reading disabilities participated in the study.
  • Sixteen students and their teachers participated in the intervention and 18 students were used as a comparison/control group.

Setting

  • This study took place in a middle school located in the U.S.

Method

  • All participants took two pretests: the Woodcock Johnson Reading Mastery Passage Comprehension subtest and a measure related to CSR strategies, which evaluated students’ knowledge of passages’ main ideas.
  • Next, participating teachers were trained in the CACSR method.
  • CACSR students were paired according to their pretest scores so that top students were paired with students performing in the lower half on the measures.
  • Students in the CACSR group participated in the intervention two times per week for 10-12 weeks.
  • During intervention sessions, each pair of students worked together on the program to read, discuss, and complete questions relating to reading passages, with each student taking the lead on every other passage.
  • The other 3 days each week, CACSR participants received the same reading instruction as their peers in the control group.
  • Following completion of the intervention, all students in the intervention and control groups were assessed using the Woodcock Johnson Reading Mastery Passage Comprehension subtest and the CSR measure again.
  • All CACSR participating students and teachers were interviewed to gather their perceptions of the intervention.

Results

  • Intervention participants outperformed their control group peers on the posttest Passage Comprehension subtest and the CSR measure.
  • In addition, 12 of the 16 student participants and the 2 participating teachers all perceived the program to be helpful and beneficial.
  • Students cited that several of the CSR strategies (i.e., getting the gist, wrap-up, and click and chunk) and the paired learning aspect of the program were the best features of the program.
  • Despite generally positive attitudes towards the program, some students acknowledged that they thought the intervention was boring.
  • Overall, the study findings suggest that CACSR is an effective tool for improving the reading comprehension skills of middle students with reading difficulties.
Categories:
  • Reading
Tags:

Computer Assisted Instruction

Improving the reading comprehension of middle school students with disabilities through computer-assisted collaborative strategic reading

Jun 28, 2013, 13:07 PM
Kim, A-H., Vaughn, S., Klinger, J. K., Woodruff, A. L., Reutebuch, C. K., & Kouzekanani, K. (2006).  Improving the reading comprehension of middle school students with disabilities through computer-assisted collaborative strategic reading. Remedial and Special Education, 27(4), 235-249.

Characteristics

  • This study examined the effectiveness of using computer-assisted collaborative strategic reading to improve the reading comprehension of middle school students with learning disabilities.
  • Computer-assisted collaborative strategic reading (CACSR) allows students to use an interactive online learning environment to help them use a variety of comprehension strategies while reading texts.
  • CACSR monitors student performance using the computer program and provides corrective feedback.
  • Non computer-assisted collaborative strategic reading is conducted by the classroom teacher, and later, independently by groups of students as they learn how to use several different pre-reading, during reading, and post-reading techniques to assist them in understanding readings.
  • This study examined pairs of students as they worked together using a computer assisted version of collaborative strategic reading.
  • Two classrooms with middle school students with reading disabilities participated in the study.
  • Sixteen students and their teachers participated in the intervention and 18 students were used as a comparison/control group.

Setting

  • This study took place in a middle school located in the U.S.

Method

  • All participants took two pretests: the Woodcock Johnson Reading Mastery Passage Comprehension subtest and a measure related to CSR strategies, which evaluated students’ knowledge of passages’ main ideas.
  • Next, participating teachers were trained in the CACSR method.
  • CACSR students were paired according to their pretest scores so that top students were paired with students performing in the lower half on the measures.
  • Students in the CACSR group participated in the intervention two times per week for 10-12 weeks.
  • During intervention sessions, each pair of students worked together on the program to read, discuss, and complete questions relating to reading passages, with each student taking the lead on every other passage.
  • The other 3 days each week, CACSR participants received the same reading instruction as their peers in the control group.
  • Following completion of the intervention, all students in the intervention and control groups were assessed using the Woodcock Johnson Reading Mastery Passage Comprehension subtest and the CSR measure again.
  • All CACSR participating students and teachers were interviewed to gather their perceptions of the intervention.

Results

  • Intervention participants outperformed their control group peers on the posttest Passage Comprehension subtest and the CSR measure.
  • In addition, 12 of the 16 student participants and the 2 participating teachers all perceived the program to be helpful and beneficial.
  • Students cited that several of the CSR strategies (i.e., getting the gist, wrap-up, and click and chunk) and the paired learning aspect of the program were the best features of the program.
  • Despite generally positive attitudes towards the program, some students acknowledged that they thought the intervention was boring.
  • Overall, the study findings suggest that CACSR is an effective tool for improving the reading comprehension skills of middle students with reading difficulties.
Categories:
  • Reading
Tags: