Reading Aides

This category of articles includes studies and reviews pertaining to the use of reading aids, such as text-to-speech software and e-books, both in and outside of the classroom.

Benefits of computer-presented speed training for poor readers

Jun 28, 2013, 12:13 PM

Irausquin, R. S., Drent, J., & Verhoeven, L. (2005). Benefits of computer-presented speed training for poor readers. Annals of Dyslexia, 55(2), 246-265.

Characteristics

  • Twenty-eight native Dutch speaking elementary students participated in the study.
  • Each participant was identified as being a “struggling reader.”
  • The study sought to examine the effectiveness of using automaticity training to improve the reading outcomes of struggling beginning readers.
  • Students used CD-ROM programs during the study that were designed to improve their reading achievement.

Setting

  • The study was conducted in participants’ schools located in the Netherlands.

Method

  • Participants took the following as pre- and post-test measures: CVC Word Reading Test, Cluster Word Reading Test, Text Reading Test, and the Reading Comprehension Test.
  • Students were divided into two 14-person groups: a computer instruction automatization group and a computer instruction context group.
  • All students received instruction in one of the above groups during 3, 15-minute sessions a week over the course of 2 months.
  • In the automatization group, computerized word decoding exercises were presented under time constraints with a limited maximum response time.
  • In the context group, students completed comprehension activities with no time limits.

Results

  • Results revealed that the automatization group participants made larger gains in text reading efficiency and were able to transfer their learning to words more complex than the 3-letter words practiced during the intervention phase.
  • There were no statistically significant differences in students’ reading accuracy or reading comprehension.
  • The results provide evidence that computer-based automatization activities can be used to improve the reading speed of beginning readers.
Categories:
  • Reading
Tags:

Computer Assisted Instruction

Benefits of computer-presented speed training for poor readers

Jun 28, 2013, 12:13 PM

Irausquin, R. S., Drent, J., & Verhoeven, L. (2005). Benefits of computer-presented speed training for poor readers. Annals of Dyslexia, 55(2), 246-265.

Characteristics

  • Twenty-eight native Dutch speaking elementary students participated in the study.
  • Each participant was identified as being a “struggling reader.”
  • The study sought to examine the effectiveness of using automaticity training to improve the reading outcomes of struggling beginning readers.
  • Students used CD-ROM programs during the study that were designed to improve their reading achievement.

Setting

  • The study was conducted in participants’ schools located in the Netherlands.

Method

  • Participants took the following as pre- and post-test measures: CVC Word Reading Test, Cluster Word Reading Test, Text Reading Test, and the Reading Comprehension Test.
  • Students were divided into two 14-person groups: a computer instruction automatization group and a computer instruction context group.
  • All students received instruction in one of the above groups during 3, 15-minute sessions a week over the course of 2 months.
  • In the automatization group, computerized word decoding exercises were presented under time constraints with a limited maximum response time.
  • In the context group, students completed comprehension activities with no time limits.

Results

  • Results revealed that the automatization group participants made larger gains in text reading efficiency and were able to transfer their learning to words more complex than the 3-letter words practiced during the intervention phase.
  • There were no statistically significant differences in students’ reading accuracy or reading comprehension.
  • The results provide evidence that computer-based automatization activities can be used to improve the reading speed of beginning readers.
Categories:
  • Reading
Tags: