Reading Aides

This category of articles includes studies and reviews pertaining to the use of reading aids, such as text-to-speech software and e-books, both in and outside of the classroom.

Establishing and maintaining an early childhood emergent literacy technology curriculum

Jun 28, 2013, 13:01 PM
Hutinger, P. L., Bell, C., Daytner, G., & Johanson, J. (2006). Establishing and maintaining an early childhood emergent literacy technology curriculum. Journal of Special Education Technology, 21(4), 39-54.

Characteristics

  • This study, which replicated and extended the findings of a previous study of the use of the Early Childhood Emergent Literacy Technology Curriculum (ELiTeC), followed the implementation of ELiTeC within 17 special education, at-risk pre-K, and inclusive classrooms.
  • Four hundred thirty-eight preschool children participated in the study; 66% of participants were labeled “at-risk” and the remaining students were receiving special education services through an Individualized Education Program.
  • The ELiTeC program involved technology-infused curriculum, technical assistance to teachers, and assistance to families in order to enhance the literacy development of preschool children.
  • The curriculum, eMERGing Literacy and Technology: Working Together, promoted literacy development using technology and included low- and high-tech adaptive devices and a technology learning center in each classroom that used a variety of software to enhance the curriculum, such as: interactive literature-based software, graphics and story-making software, and authoring programs students and classrooms used to develop their own software.

Setting

  • The ELiTeC program was implemented in 17 different preschool classrooms during the second wave of data collection.

Method

  • The ELiTeC program was implemented in 17 classrooms over the course of the 3 year study period.
  • Throughout the implementation process, qualitative and quantitative data was gathered in order to examine the effectiveness of the implementation, model fidelity, maintenance, and training.
  • Participating teachers completed questionnaires including a needs assessment, a teaching style checklist, participant evaluations, fidelity profiles, and also participated in interviews and kept field notes.
  • Data sources on student participants included the Behavior Interaction Tool, a measure of children’s behaviors while engaging in computer-based activities, the Individual Literacy Assessment, and other qualitative measures of student behaviors.
  • Data was gathered on a non-treatment comparison group of students who did not participate in the program.

Results

  • Data analysis indicated that the programming was effective when technology literacy activities were a main component of class activities; an average of 57 minutes/day was spent on technology literacy activities in the classes.
  • Teachers reported that ongoing technical support was beneficial, especially for complex programs such as HyperStudio, the authoring software program used in the study.
  • The technical training also allowed teachers to increase their comfort with using technology and in creating things such as newsletters and assessments.
  • Participating classes demonstrated good maintenance of the ELiTeC model after the initial implementation phase ended.
  • Children in treatment groups showed gains in literacy and technology use over the course of the 3 year study, and these gains were significantly larger than the gains of students in the non-treatment comparison group.
Categories:
  • Reading
Tags:

Computer Assisted Instruction

Establishing and maintaining an early childhood emergent literacy technology curriculum

Jun 28, 2013, 13:01 PM
Hutinger, P. L., Bell, C., Daytner, G., & Johanson, J. (2006). Establishing and maintaining an early childhood emergent literacy technology curriculum. Journal of Special Education Technology, 21(4), 39-54.

Characteristics

  • This study, which replicated and extended the findings of a previous study of the use of the Early Childhood Emergent Literacy Technology Curriculum (ELiTeC), followed the implementation of ELiTeC within 17 special education, at-risk pre-K, and inclusive classrooms.
  • Four hundred thirty-eight preschool children participated in the study; 66% of participants were labeled “at-risk” and the remaining students were receiving special education services through an Individualized Education Program.
  • The ELiTeC program involved technology-infused curriculum, technical assistance to teachers, and assistance to families in order to enhance the literacy development of preschool children.
  • The curriculum, eMERGing Literacy and Technology: Working Together, promoted literacy development using technology and included low- and high-tech adaptive devices and a technology learning center in each classroom that used a variety of software to enhance the curriculum, such as: interactive literature-based software, graphics and story-making software, and authoring programs students and classrooms used to develop their own software.

Setting

  • The ELiTeC program was implemented in 17 different preschool classrooms during the second wave of data collection.

Method

  • The ELiTeC program was implemented in 17 classrooms over the course of the 3 year study period.
  • Throughout the implementation process, qualitative and quantitative data was gathered in order to examine the effectiveness of the implementation, model fidelity, maintenance, and training.
  • Participating teachers completed questionnaires including a needs assessment, a teaching style checklist, participant evaluations, fidelity profiles, and also participated in interviews and kept field notes.
  • Data sources on student participants included the Behavior Interaction Tool, a measure of children’s behaviors while engaging in computer-based activities, the Individual Literacy Assessment, and other qualitative measures of student behaviors.
  • Data was gathered on a non-treatment comparison group of students who did not participate in the program.

Results

  • Data analysis indicated that the programming was effective when technology literacy activities were a main component of class activities; an average of 57 minutes/day was spent on technology literacy activities in the classes.
  • Teachers reported that ongoing technical support was beneficial, especially for complex programs such as HyperStudio, the authoring software program used in the study.
  • The technical training also allowed teachers to increase their comfort with using technology and in creating things such as newsletters and assessments.
  • Participating classes demonstrated good maintenance of the ELiTeC model after the initial implementation phase ended.
  • Children in treatment groups showed gains in literacy and technology use over the course of the 3 year study, and these gains were significantly larger than the gains of students in the non-treatment comparison group.
Categories:
  • Reading
Tags: