Reading Aides

This category of articles includes studies and reviews pertaining to the use of reading aids, such as text-to-speech software and e-books, both in and outside of the classroom.

Literacy by design: A universal design for learning approach for students with significant intellectual disabilities

Jun 28, 2013, 13:14 PM
Coyne, P., Pisha, B., Dalton, B., Zeph, L. A., & Smith, N. C. (2010). Literacy by design: A universal design for learning approach for students with significant intellectual disabilities. Remedial and Special Education, 1-11.

Characteristics

  • This study sought to investigate the effectiveness of using Literacy by Design (LBD), a software program that uses universally designed e-book and word recognition activities, to improve the sight word recognition and vocabulary of young students with significant intellectual disabilities.
  • Sixteen students grades kindergarten through 2nd with intellectual disabilities participated in the study; 5 participants took part in the LBD intervention.
  • LBD combines computer-based literacy instruction with readings of multimedia e-books that utilize universal design features, which aim to improve the general accessibility of the program by providing multiple methods for approaching and interacting with program features.

Setting

  • The study took place in 9 elementary classrooms located in two New England U.S. states.

Method

  • All participating teachers attended a day-long workshop on best practices in early literacy.
  • LBD teachers received 1 additional day of training using LBD e-books, WiggleWorks e-books, and Riverdeep’s Island Adventure and Ocean Adventure.
  • LBD participants read 4 scaffolded e-books from LBD, each of which included a “Read and Understand” and a “Read Aloud” option, and also used WiggleWorks e-books and Riverdeep’s Island Adventure and Ocean Adventure.
  • All 16 participants participated in a 90-minute literacy block each school day from October-May.
  • For LBD participants, 20-30 minutes of each session involved using the intervention software.
  • Researchers observed LBD teachers on a weekly basis while control teachers were observed once a month.
  • Control and LBD participants were assessed using the reading subtests of the Woodcock-Johnson Test of Achievement, Third Edition (WJ-III Ach).

Results

  • LBD participants performed significantly better on post-test measures of reading comprehension, decoding, and listening comprehension than their control group peers.
  • Observers noted that instruction in LBD classrooms moved from initially being more skill based to placing more emphasis on reading comprehension throughout the course of the intervention while the control classrooms generally focused on skill building throughout the year.
  • The results support the potential efficacy of using universally designed e-book software to improve the reading skills of young students with intellectual disabilities.
  • In addition, the findings indicate that instruction for students with intellectual disabilities should go beyond just teaching basic sight word recognition and functional literacy to also teach strategies for reading for meaning.
Categories:
  • Reading
Tags:

Computer Assisted Instruction

Literacy by design: A universal design for learning approach for students with significant intellectual disabilities

Jun 28, 2013, 13:14 PM
Coyne, P., Pisha, B., Dalton, B., Zeph, L. A., & Smith, N. C. (2010). Literacy by design: A universal design for learning approach for students with significant intellectual disabilities. Remedial and Special Education, 1-11.

Characteristics

  • This study sought to investigate the effectiveness of using Literacy by Design (LBD), a software program that uses universally designed e-book and word recognition activities, to improve the sight word recognition and vocabulary of young students with significant intellectual disabilities.
  • Sixteen students grades kindergarten through 2nd with intellectual disabilities participated in the study; 5 participants took part in the LBD intervention.
  • LBD combines computer-based literacy instruction with readings of multimedia e-books that utilize universal design features, which aim to improve the general accessibility of the program by providing multiple methods for approaching and interacting with program features.

Setting

  • The study took place in 9 elementary classrooms located in two New England U.S. states.

Method

  • All participating teachers attended a day-long workshop on best practices in early literacy.
  • LBD teachers received 1 additional day of training using LBD e-books, WiggleWorks e-books, and Riverdeep’s Island Adventure and Ocean Adventure.
  • LBD participants read 4 scaffolded e-books from LBD, each of which included a “Read and Understand” and a “Read Aloud” option, and also used WiggleWorks e-books and Riverdeep’s Island Adventure and Ocean Adventure.
  • All 16 participants participated in a 90-minute literacy block each school day from October-May.
  • For LBD participants, 20-30 minutes of each session involved using the intervention software.
  • Researchers observed LBD teachers on a weekly basis while control teachers were observed once a month.
  • Control and LBD participants were assessed using the reading subtests of the Woodcock-Johnson Test of Achievement, Third Edition (WJ-III Ach).

Results

  • LBD participants performed significantly better on post-test measures of reading comprehension, decoding, and listening comprehension than their control group peers.
  • Observers noted that instruction in LBD classrooms moved from initially being more skill based to placing more emphasis on reading comprehension throughout the course of the intervention while the control classrooms generally focused on skill building throughout the year.
  • The results support the potential efficacy of using universally designed e-book software to improve the reading skills of young students with intellectual disabilities.
  • In addition, the findings indicate that instruction for students with intellectual disabilities should go beyond just teaching basic sight word recognition and functional literacy to also teach strategies for reading for meaning.
Categories:
  • Reading
Tags: