The effect of active student responding during computer-assistied instruction on social studies learning by students with learning disabilities

Jul 2, 2013, 12:32 PM
Jerome, A., & Barbetta, P. M. (2005). The effect of active student responding during computer-assisted instruction on social studies learning by students with learning disabilities. Journal of Special Education Technology, 20(3), 13-23.

Characteristics

  • Five 5th grade students (2 females and 3 males) with learning disabilities participated in the study.
  • Participants learned social studies facts using Hyperstudio, a computer-assisted instruction (CAI) software program, in order to examine the impact the program had on students with learning disabilities’ acquisition and maintenance of social studies facts.
  • More specifically, the study sought to compare the effectiveness of 3 types of student responses (i.e., active student responses vs. silently reading facts on the computer) during CAI for social studies facts using the Hyperstudio software program.

Setting

  • The study took place at the students’ school.

Method

  • A series of 21 unknown social studies facts were presented each week via Hyperstudio software for 8 weeks. 
  • The method of CAI varied so that 7 facts were presented as Clicking-ASR, 7 were presented as Repeating-ASR, and 7 were presented as Listening-OT each week for the first 6 weeks.
  • In the Clicking-ASR condition, students were presented with the fact both visually and orally and then were asked fill in the missing word from the fact with one of two options on the next screen.
  • In the Repeating-ASR condition, students were presented with the fact both visually and orally and then were asked to repeat the fact out loud.
  • In the Listening-OT condition, students were presented with the fact both visually and orally and then were prompted by the computer to listen as the computer read the fact a second time.
  • Participants also took same-day tests, next-day tests, and one- and two-week maintenance tests on the facts introduced during CAI.
  • During weeks 7 and 8, participants received instruction in the condition that was most effective in order to observe the effects of the condition in isolation.

Results

  • The Repeating-ASR condition yielded the highest score on same-day and next-day tests for all participants.
  • The Clicking-ASR condition produced the second highest same-day test score for 4 out of 5 participants and the second highest next-day test score for all participants.
  • All participants also had the highest score on maintenance tests that assessed their retrieval of Repeating-ASR facts.
  • This study supports the use of CAI with students with learning disabilities, particularly when the instruction allows the student to provide an active (vs. passive) response during the computer lesson.
  • In addition, this study’s results indicate that for maximum effectiveness, CAI for students with learning disabilities should contain an oral response component.
Categories:
  • Social Studies
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